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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
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History at Its Source Marker image, Touch for more information
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, February 13, 2021
History at Its Source Marker
SHOWN IN SOURCE-SPECIFIED ORDER
1Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — 1 — History at Its Source#1 — Huntsville Water Trail
(Preface) Welcome to the Huntsville Water Trail at Big Spring Park, a celebration of our city's history, spirit, and ingenuity. Follow these signs to learn how the Big Spring helped shape Huntsville's creation, and how it's still helping us . . . Map (db m167110) HM
2Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — 2 — Making the Water Work#2 — Huntsville Water Trail
Once John Hunt started bringing settlers in, the town began growing fast. Within five years, LeRoy Pope — who had big plans for the area — bought Big Spring and much of the land around it, including the site of John Hunt's cabin. Then . . . Map (db m167109) HM
3Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — 3 — The Spring Runs Its Course#3 - Huntsville Water Trail
After the building of the dam and pump system in 1823, Huntsville enjoyed more than a century of continued growth. In 1843, LeRoy Pope's son, William generously sold Big Spring to the city for the paltry sum of one dollar, and in 1858 the city . . . Map (db m167108) HM
4Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — 4 — The Big Spring of Today#4 — Huntsville Water Trail
By 1957, the Big Spring that was once so essential to Huntsville's origin and growth, was no longer the city's primary water supply. However, Big Spring Park lives on as a source of pride for the city and a monument to its founding. Even with all . . . Map (db m167104) HM
5Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — 7 — Where Does the Spring Water Go?#7 — Huntsville Water Trail
Roughly 7-20 million gallons of water emerge from The Big Spring every day. Even in the 19th and 20th centuries, when people used the spring as their main water supply, most of the water generated by The Big Spring flowed down the Indian Creek Canal . . . Map (db m167111) HM
 
 
 
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Apr. 12, 2021