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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Pages Containing «howling mob»

 
Who Was the Howling Mob? Marker image, Touch for more information
By the Howling Mob Society, used with permission, circa 2007
Who Was the Howling Mob? Marker
RANKED BY RELEVANCE, THEN GEOGRAPHICALLY
1Pennsylvania (Allegheny County), Pittsburgh — Who Was the Howling Mob?Great Railroad Strike of 1877
In 1877, the population of Pittsburgh was approximately 120,000. It is estimated that 30,000 people — a full quarter of the city's population — participated in The Great Strike and the rioting that ensued. Roughly half of the rioters . . . — Map (db m26107) HM

2Pennsylvania (Allegheny County), Pittsburgh — Great Strike Ignites the Nation!Great Railroad Strike of 1877
The Great Strike of 1877 was not exclusive to Pittsburgh. The first signs of what would become a popular uprising appeared on the B&O Line in Baltimore, on July 16th 1877. Unrest in Baltimore was initially suppressed. The next day, however, trainmen . . . — Map (db m26106) HM
3Pennsylvania (Allegheny County), Pittsburgh — Pat the Avenger Returns FireGreat Railroad Strike of 1877
In The Great Strike of 1877, a labor dispute between workers and the Pennsylvania Railroad Company set off a popular uprising. The Philadelphia militia shot into an unarmed crowd on July 21st and then took shelter in the roundhouse at 26th Street. . . . — Map (db m26113) HM
4Pennsylvania (Allegheny County), Pittsburgh — Safe Haven Denied at Allegheny ArsenalGreat Railroad Strike of 1877
In the Great Strike of 1877, a labor dispute between workers and the Pennsylvania Railroad Company set off a popular uprising. Militiamen were called in to put down the strike and clashed with disgruntled citizens. On the second day of the conflict, . . . — Map (db m26213) HM
5Pennsylvania (Allegheny County), Pittsburgh — Seige at the 26th Street RoundhouseGreat Railroad Strike of 1877
On July 21st 1877, the Philadelphia militia fired into a vocal crowd of striking Pennsylvania trainmen and sympathizers. Twenty people were killed, including at least three children. Many more were wounded. Following the attack, the militia . . . — Map (db m26111) HM
6Pennsylvania (Allegheny County), Pittsburgh — State Violence Incites RiotingGreat Railroad Strike of 1877
On July 20th, 1877, striking railroad workers in Pittsburgh successfully stopped trains from leaving the freight yard in the Strip District. The sheriff was called upon to clear the tracks by railroad officials, anxious to regain control of their . . . — Map (db m26109) HM
7Pennsylvania (Allegheny County), Pittsburgh — The Desperate and the DecadentGreat Railroad Strike of 1877
The Great Strike of 1877 was instigated by a ten percent cut in workmen’s wages on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad—one cut of many since the panic of 1873. The industry at large had experienced significant wage cuts and lay offs. By 1877, . . . — Map (db m26108) HM
8Pennsylvania (Allegheny County), Pittsburgh — The Empty Pocket PaysGreat Railroad Strike of 1877
In 1877, The Pennsylvania Railroad Company (PRR) was the largest corporation in the world. In that year the PRR, like railroads across the country, instituted massive lay-offs and wage cuts—reportedly due to declining profits. When workers on . . . — Map (db m26104) HM
9Pennsylvania (Allegheny County), Pittsburgh — The Menace of the Iron HorseGreat Railroad Strike of 1877
Between 1865 and 1880, the railroad system grew rapidly, tripling in size and connecting urban areas throughout the country. Generally unchecked, railroad tracks cut through the heart of cities, with little concern for the best interests of . . . — Map (db m26110) HM
10Pennsylvania (Allegheny County), Pittsburgh — Twenty Murdered and a City Rises UpGreat Railroad Strike of 1877
A pivotal moment in The Great Strike happened here, on July 21st, 1877. Striking railroad workers blocked the tracks, while their families and supporters looked on from the hillside. Militiamen were brought in from Philadelphia to clear the workers . . . — Map (db m26112) HM
 
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Jan. 26, 2021