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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Barracks Row Heritage Trail Historical Markers

 
Washington and Mechanics Savings Bank image, Touch for more information
By Kevin Vincent, July 3, 2012
Washington and Mechanics Savings Bank
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 6 — A Neighborhood For EveryoneTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
The buildings near this corner were built during a wave of private development that began after the United States won the Spanish-American War in 1898, and became a world power for the first time. As America flexed its muscles, the world — . . . — Map (db m57119) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 2 — At the CrossroadsTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
The large building that wraps around this corner was constructed as a department store in 1892 by Elizabeth A. Haines. She proudly advertised it as "the largest store in the world, built, owned and controlled by a woman." Back then extended . . . — Map (db m123107) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 12 — Christ Church and Its ParishionersTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
This is Christ Church, Washington Parish, the first Episcopal church established in Washington City (1794), and attended by Presidents Thomas Jefferson and John Quincy Adams. At first Christ Church met in a nearby tobacco warehouse. In 1806 . . . — Map (db m39235) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 3 — Commerce and CommunityTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
The home/music studio of John Esputa, Jr., once occupied the site of 511 Eighth Street (Shakespeare Theatre’s rehearsal hall.) Among Esputa’s students in 1861 was eight-year-old John Philip Sousa, whose irresistible marches made him one of . . . — Map (db m64884) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 1 — Edge of the RowTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
America’s oldest navy and marine installations are just blocks from where you are standing. This is the northern edge of a Capitol Hill community shaped by the presence of the U.S. military. Eighth Street is its commercial center. The . . . — Map (db m130729) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 4 — Healing the WoundedTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
In 1866 the Navy completed the hospital you see across the street to treat injured and ailing seamen. With beds for 50, it included the carriage house/stable and cast-iron fence and (around the corner) the gazebo. Its front door originally was . . . — Map (db m50813) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 13 — In the AlleyTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
[Left panel:] You are standing in one of Washington’s remaining inhabited alleys, behind the buildings that face G, E (there is no F Street here), Sixth and Seventh streets. In 1897 the alley had 22 tiny dwellings sheltering well over 100 . . . — Map (db m39275) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 14 — Life on the ParkTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
You are standing across from Marion Park, named for Francis Marion, the celebrated South Carolina state senator (1782-1790) who earned the moniker "Swamp Fox" for his brilliant stealth tactics against the British during the Revolutionary War. . . . — Map (db m113633) HM WM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 16 — Meet You At the MarketTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
This is Eastern Market, where for more than a century farm products have drawn shoppers from the neighborhood and around the city. It is Washington's only 19th-century market to remain in continuous operation to this day. Eastern Market is . . . — Map (db m128221) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 5 — Oldest Post of the CorpsTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
On your left is Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., the oldest continuously manned post in the U.S. Marine Corps. The installation was originally designed by architect George Hadfield in 1801 with a central parade ground and housing for 500 . . . — Map (db m130737) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 7 — Strike Up the BandTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
If you are hearing the ringing tones of band music, one of the ensembles of the world-famous United States Marine Band may be practicing inside the Marine Barracks. John Philip Sousa, the neighborhood’s most famous son, spent 19 years . . . — Map (db m66727) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 10 — Washington Navy Yard: Maker of WeaponsTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
The white brick wall in front of you marks the original northern boundary of the Navy Yard. The yard grew from its original 12 acres to 128 acres at its peak in 1962. In 2003 it consisted of 73 acres with 55 acres making up the adjacent . . . — Map (db m130739) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 9 — Washington Navy Yard: Serving the FleetTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
In front of you is the main gate of the Washington Navy Yard, established in 1799. It is the U.S. Navy's oldest shore facility in continuous use. Over time, workers here have built and repaired ships and their fittings, designed and developed . . . — Map (db m130740) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Navy Yard — 8 — William Prout: Community BuilderTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
Most of the land that is now Capitol Hill—including portions of the Navy Yard – once belonged to William Prout, who lived in a large house on this block. In 1799 and 1801 he sold and traded land to the U.S. government for both the . . . — Map (db m130742) HM

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