Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rome in Oneida County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Bull

 
 
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 17, 2008
1. Fort Bull Marker
Inscription.
On Water Route
Destroyed And
Many Killed By
French & Indians
March 27 1756

 
Erected 1907.
 
Location. 43° 13.409′ N, 75° 30.118′ W. Marker is in Rome, New York, in Oneida County. Marker can be reached from Rome New London Road (New York State Route 46/49). Touch for map. The Marker is located behind the former Erie Canal Village in Rome N.Y. and is on the property of the Rome Historical Society. Access is restricted to guided tours only and may be arranged by calling 315-336-5870. Marker is in this post office area: Rome NY 13440, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Clinton's Ditch (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Erie Canal Enlargement (about 700 feet away); The Erie Canal - July 4, 1817 (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Fort Bull (approx. 0.2 miles away); Erie Canal (approx. 0.3 miles away); U.S. Arsenal (approx. 1.8 miles away); The Oneida Carrying Place (approx. 2.1 miles away); Stars & Stripes First Flew in Battle (approx. 2.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rome.
 
Regarding Fort Bull.
Battle
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 17, 2008
2. Fort Bull Marker
of Fort Bull

In the summer of 1755 General William Shirley led an expedition to Oswego, NY where he established forts, as an advanced base to attack the French garrisons at Niagara. Supplies were brought forward coming up the Mohawk River to the Great Carry Place, at present day Rome, and from there down winding Wood Creek to Oswego. Winter set in before his plans were complete so storehouses were built at the east and west ends of the carry, and forts were hastily constructed to protect the supplies.

Small boats brought food and munitions to Fort Williams at the upper limit of navigation on the Mohawk River. From there sleighs took supplies forward to Fort Bull on Wood Creek. When spring opened navigation on Wood Creek the stored material could quickly be forwarded to Oswego.

In March 1756 a French force under the command of Lt. Gaspard de Lery, marched from Fort La Presentation, on the St Lawrence River, 175 miles through a trackless winter wilderness and made a surprise attack on Fort Bull.

Lt. William Bull, the fort's commander, refused to surrender. The French battered in the gate and took the fort by storm. The fort and supplies were burned and the raiders disappeared back into the wilderness. Deprived of supplies the Forts at Oswego fell easily to French attack that summer.
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesWar, French and IndianWaterways & Vessels
 
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 17, 2008
3. Fort Bull Marker
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 29, 2011
4. Fort Bull Marker
Distant view of Fort Bull seen in an opening in the woods, to the left of the British flag.
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 29, 2011
5. Fort Bull Marker
The pathway through what was once the earthwork fortifications protecting Fort Bull. View of the historical marker in the distant background.
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 29, 2011
6. Fort Bull Marker
View of some of the remaining earthwork fortifications that once made up Fort Bull, with a view of the historical marker in the left background.
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 29, 2011
7. Fort Bull Marker
View of the trail that goes through the Erie Canal Village Historic Site, on it's way back to the Fort Bull historic marker (located just in front of the distant trees in the far left of the picture).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 12, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 15, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 704 times since then and 45 times this year. Last updated on December 10, 2016, by Arthur L. Simmons III of Rome, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 15, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on April 7, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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