Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oakland in Alameda County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Site of Blossom Rock Navigation Trees

 
 
Site of Blossom Rock Navigation Trees Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 31, 2013
1. Site of Blossom Rock Navigation Trees Marker
Inscription. Until at least 1851, Redwood trees on this site were used as landmarks to avoid striking the treacherous submerged Blossom Rock in San Francisco Bay west of Yerba Buena Island. Although by 1855 the original stems had been logged, today's trees are sprouts from their stumps.

California Registered Historical Landmark No. 962

Plaque placed by the State Department of Parks and Recreation in cooperation with the East Bay Regional Park District, August 23, 1986.


 
Erected 1986 by California State Department of Parks and Recreation and the East Bay Regional Parks District. (Marker Number 962.)
 
Location. 37° 48.648′ N, 122° 10.471′ W. Marker is in Oakland, California, in Alameda County. Marker can be reached from Skyline Boulevard half a mile north of Joaquin Miller Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 10570 Skyline Boulevard, Oakland CA 94611, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. 442nd Regimental Combat Team Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Commemoration of Old Redwood Road from Redwood Canyon (approx. one mile away); The Monument Loop: A Legacy
Blossom Rock Navigation Trees Marker and Interpretive Panel - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 31, 2013
2. Blossom Rock Navigation Trees Marker and Interpretive Panel - Wide View
(approx. one mile away); The Creation of a Park (approx. one mile away); Joaquin Miller (approx. one mile away); Joaquin Millerís Abbey (approx. one mile away); A Haven for Artists (approx. one mile away); Voyage of the Brooklyn (approx. 1.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oakland.
 
Also see . . .
1. In the Shadow of Giants The Redwoods of the Oakland Hills. Gordy Slack intertwines the natural history and the history of the redwoods in the East Bay. On the aftermath of logging: "In 1893, William P. Gibbons, a naturalist with the California Academy of Sciences, published an account from some 40 years earlier when he had surveyed the “sea of stumps” in the Oakland hills, where Roberts Recreation Area and the adjacent Redwood Regional Parkís Redwood Bowl now stand. One of those stumps was about 31 feet across at a height of four feet above the ground. That would be one of the widest trees on record. Naturalists suspect that it may have been one of two trees used by sailors beginning in the Spanish colonial period as landmarks to help them navigate through the Golden Gate without hitting Blossom Rock, a treacherous, barely submerged rock near Yerba Buena Island. After the “Blossom Rock” trees were cut in the early 1850s, Alcatraz lighthouse took over their navigational function." (Submitted on April 17, 2013.) 

2. The Landmark Trees - Interpretive Panel. The East Bay Regional Park District's interpetive panel (visible in the wide view of the marker)for the Navigation Trees. Includes charts showing the locations of both Blossom Rock and the Navigation Trees, as well as an excerpt by F.W. Beechey, Captain of HMS Blossom, describing how to avoid the rock by lining up the navigation trees with the northern tip of Yerba Buena Island. (Submitted on May 3, 2013.) 
 
Categories. EnvironmentHorticulture & ForestryWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 22, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 16, 2013, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 565 times since then and 81 times this year. Last updated on December 20, 2016, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 16, 2013, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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