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Muncy in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Welcome to Port Penn

 
 
Welcome to Port Penn Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 22, 2018
1. Welcome to Port Penn Marker
Inscription.

Established in the 1830s, Port Penn grew as fast as traffic through this section of the West Branch of the Pennsylvania Canal allowed. There were hotels and taverns as well as blacksmiths to shoe mules, lumberyards and sawmills to supply wood, boatyards and docks where canal boats were built and repaired, and dry goods merchants who handled products by the ton. The chief articles of export were hogs, wheat, flour, lumber, dried and salted meats, leather and whiskey. In canal days, there were 13 distilleries in the Muncy area with a total output of 1,200 to 1,500 gallons a day.

From 1830 to 1890, canals fueled new businesses and industry. The canal helped end the isolation of great sections of the country. Not only opening a market for the farmers, back-country mills and factories but also providing employment — owners, captains, boaters, and lockkeepers. River communities mushroomed into thriving ports overnight, and thousands of immigrants streamed into these areas. Canals made the development of river towns, like Muncy, possible by providing abundant water power and reliable, inexpensive transportation. Industries along the canal flourished — the Stolz Flour Mill, Muncy Woolen Mills — a major textile manufacturer, Sprout-Waldron's metal fabricating business, and other water-powered industries like the Clapp

Welcome to Port Penn Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 22, 2018
2. Welcome to Port Penn Marker
and Rissel lumber and shingle mill, located right here in Port Penn.

On a Canal Boat
Imagine that it is 1838 and you are on the deck of a canal boat, either a cargo or passenger boat. A team of mules has towed your boat from dawn to dusk for several days, traveling up river from Harrisburg with a load of cloth and barrels of goods bound for the merchants of Muncy. As you glide into Lock No. 21, a small, busy port west of Muncy comes into view. Just past Lock No. 21 is the basin where you will tie up awaiting first light and the chance to unload your boat. [Photo] At left, PA Canal Boat No. 502 unloads coal at the Sprout-Waldron Company plant in 1891.

A packet boat is another name for a passenger boat. While these long and narrow packets hauled people in comfort compared to stage coaches, packets rapidly disappeared from the canals as the railroad industry expanded through Pennsylvania. Passengers who wanted to board or disembark in the Muncy area could only do so at Port Penn; cargo boats could unload and load all along the Port Penn-Muncy section of the West Branch of the Pennsylvania Canal. At left is an illustration of a typical canal boat with passengers both inside and seated on the roof.

The Lockkeeper
Lock No. 21, a combination outlet and lift lock, and lift lock No. 22, which is located 1/8 mile from here, was operated from sunrise to

Map of Port Penn in <i>Atlas of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania</i>, 1873 image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
3. Map of Port Penn in Atlas of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, 1873
sunset by the lockkeeper who lived here with his family. Since the lockkeeper had to open locks to canal traffic, the two-story lockhouses were almost always sited near the lock. They used the drinking well and placed their trash in a pit along side the canal.

The lockkeeper at Muncy Lock No. 21 probably would have lived in a house similar to this one [illustration] that once stood along the West Branch Canal.

In addition to the lockkeeper's house, there were storage sheds and a barn where fresh mules could be exchanged or purchased.

An employee of the canal company, the lockkeeper was responsible for the care and operation of a lock. He also was there to prevent the waste of water, to prevent damage to the canal and lock, and to ensure that boats received prompt passage, six to seven days a week.

[Map] At left, is a detail of Lock No. 21 of the PA Railroad Co Survey from the mid 1800s.
 
Erected by Muncy Historical Society and Museum of History, PA DCNR, Susquehanna Greenway, et al.
 
Location. 41° 11.552′ N, 76° 48.19′ W. Marker is in Muncy, Pennsylvania, in Lycoming County. Touch for map. Marker is at the Muncy Heritage Park and Nature Trail, along Pepper Street north of the park entrance. Marker is in this post office area: Muncy PA 17756, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Drinking Well (a few steps from this marker); The Lock-tender and His House (a few steps from this marker); How a Lock Works (within shouting distance of this marker); Nature's Highway (within shouting distance of this marker); Canal Boat Building (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Canal Boats (about 400 feet away); Fisher Pond (about 500 feet away); Old Walton Cemetery (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Muncy.
 
Also see . . .
1. CANAL DISCOVERY: The duties of a lock tender. (Submitted on July 30, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Making It Work: The Lock. (Submitted on July 30, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Muncy Creek Township, Lycoming County PA at Wikipedia. (Submitted on July 30, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. Muncy Historical Society PA. (Submitted on July 30, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesWaterways & Vessels

 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 30, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 30, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 45 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 30, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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