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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gallatin in Sumner County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

First Presbyterian Church

American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site

 
 
First Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 23, 2013
1. First Presbyterian Church Marker
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  The oldest church building in Gallatin in continuous existence, this church was organized October 25, 1828. The building was erected in 1836-37 and is an example of early Greek Revival architecture. The sanctuary was used as a hospital for Federal troops during the Civil War.
 
Erected by Tennessee Historical Commision. (Marker Number 3B 41, 176.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the American Presbyterian and Reformed Historic Sites, and the Tennessee Historical Commission marker series.
 
Location. 36° 23.256′ N, 86° 26.923′ W. Marker is in Gallatin, Tennessee, in Sumner County. Marker is at the intersection of West Main Street (Tennessee Route 25) and South Foster Avenue, on the right when traveling east on West Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 167 West Main Street, Gallatin TN 37066, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Trousdale Place (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Trousdale Place (within
First Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 23, 2013
2. First Presbyterian Church Marker
shouting distance of this marker); Gallatin, Tennessee (within shouting distance of this marker); Gallatin Public Square (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Randy's Record Shop (approx. 0.2 miles away); Tennessee's First African-American Civil War Volunteers (approx. 0.2 miles away); Monument to the Fallen (approx. 0.3 miles away); Sumner County Tennessee Mexican-American War Monument (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gallatin.
 
More about this marker. The American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site marker plaque can be seen on the church building in the background in submitted photos.
 
Regarding First Presbyterian Church. The First Presbyterian Church was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. This church is also one of 445 American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Sites registered between 1973 and 2003 by the Presbyterian Historical Society (PHS), headquartered in Philadelphia. Approved sites received a metal plaque featuring John Calvin’s seal
First Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 23, 2013
3. First Presbyterian Church Marker
and the site’s registry number (PHS marker location in front of church building).

The following text is taken from the Presbyterian Historical Society website:

Organized in 1828, the First Church is the oldest Christian congregation in continuous existence in the city of Gallatin. The congregation worships in the original church building, constructed in 1836-1837. A combination of Greek Revival and Victorian Gothic design, the church underwent extensive renovation in 1896. Additions since then include a two-story educational building in 1925, a fellowship hall in 1949, and offices and meeting rooms in 1967-1968.
 
Also see . . .  National Register of Historic Places datasheet. Statement of significance for this church. (Submitted on August 15, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.) 
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 17, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 5, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 442 times since then and 65 times this year. Last updated on August 15, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 5, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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