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St. Augustine in St. Johns County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Bloody Mose

Fort Mose Historic State Park

 
 
Bloody Mose Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, December 10, 2014
1. Bloody Mose Marker
Inscription. In 1740, the English attacked St. Augustine, but departed after a bloody battle at Fort Mose.

Georgia Governor James Oglethorpe invaded Florida with a sizable force, including Lower Creeks and Uchise Indian allies. Fort Mose inhabitants evacuated to the protective fortifications of St. Augustine while the city withstood a month-long naval bombardment by Royal Navy ships sent from Jamaica.

Just before daybreak on June 14, 1740, a detachment of Spanish forces, including Indians and free blacks led by Francisco Menéndez attacked the British at Fort Mose. They killed 75 surprised English invaders in brutal hand-to-hand combat. The victory at Mose disheartened Oglethorpe and hastened English withdrawal from Florida. English accounts referred to the battle as “Bloody Mose” or “Fatal Mose,” and expressed horror at the defenders' ferocity.
 
Erected by Fort Mose Historic State Park.
 
Location. 29° 55.735′ N, 81° 19.511′ W. Marker is in St. Augustine, Florida, in St. Johns County. Marker is on Fort Mose Trail 0.2 miles east of North Ponce De Leon Boulevard (U.S. 1), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker located in Fort Mose Historic State Park,
Marker detail: Thomas Silver map, 1740, depicting Oglethorpe's siege of St. Augustine image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of P.K. Yonge Library, Gainesville, Florida
2. Marker detail: Thomas Silver map, 1740, depicting Oglethorpe's siege of St. Augustine
beside the sidewalk leading from the parking lot to the visitor center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 15 Fort Mose Trail, Saint Augustine FL 32084, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. El Pueblo de Gracia Real de Santa Teresa de Mose (here, next to this marker); Fort Mose II (here, next to this marker); Fort Mose I (a few steps from this marker); Evacuation (a few steps from this marker); Escape & Flight (a few steps from this marker); British Enslavement (within shouting distance of this marker); Middle Passage (within shouting distance of this marker); African Origins (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Augustine.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Fort Mose Historic State Park
 
Also see . . .
1. Bloody Battle of Fort Mose. Historic reenactors depict the Bloody Battle of Fort Mose where Spanish soldiers, free black militiamen, and Yamasee Indians joined forces to defeat British invaders on June 26, 1740. The Bloody Battle of Fort Mose successfully ended Oglethorpe’s siege of St. Augustine, and returned control of Florida to the Spanish. Fort Mose was destroyed during the battle, and it would take twelve years to rebuild the outpost. (Submitted on December 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Marker detail: ”Assault on Fort Mose” - Florida National Guard painting by Jackson Walker image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of the Florida National Archives
3. Marker detail: ”Assault on Fort Mose” - Florida National Guard painting by Jackson Walker
Bottom: Cast of a socket bayonet for a musket similar to a weapon used at Mose. Courtesy of the Bureau of Archaeological Research, Florida Department of State.
 

2. The journey of Africans to St. Augustine, Florida. On June 26 a 300-man force of Spanish troops, black militiamen, and Yamasee Indians took back Fort Mose, killing 68 of Oglethorpe’s men and taking another 34 prisoner. It wasn’t very long until it was no longer safe to live in Fort Mose, and many returned to the safety of St. Augustine. Others tried living in the nearby Native American villages, and still others would return from time to time to try and live at the fort. Eventually, the fort was destroyed during the bloody battle of Fort Mose on June 26, 1740. (Submitted on December 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Fort Mose Historic State Park. Florida Department of Environmental Protection (Submitted on December 3, 2018.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansColonial EraForts, CastlesNotable Events
 
Bloody Mose Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, December 10, 2014
4. Bloody Mose Marker (wide view)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 2, 2019. This page originally submitted on December 1, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 65 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 1, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4. submitted on December 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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