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Sister Bay in Door County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Village of Sister Bay

A Prosperous Port on Green Bay

 
 
Village of Sister Bay Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 20, 2018
1. Village of Sister Bay Marker
Inscription.  
Village life has always revolved around this deep water port.
The community of Sister Bay was born in 1870 when the firm of Henderson, Coon & Dimond built a pier, sawmill, grist mill, hotel, and two stores. They hired Swedish woodchoppers from Marinette to cut timber from the wilderness for their mill. As lumbering declined, the deep harbor welcomed steamboats filled with tourists who flocked here for relaxation and recreation.

The Woodchoppers
Strapping Swedish lumberjacks crowded into Sister Bay lumber camps. One famous champion woodchopper, known as "Long John", had an appetite to match. A Sister Bay storekeeper bet $5 that he couldn't eat five dozen eggs from the counter. Long John accepted on the condition that he also get a pint of whiskey. He ate all the eggs, drank his whiskey, then went home and still had room for a loaf of bread and a pan of milk. (H.R Holand, History of Door County, 1917)

Growing Village Faces Tragedy
When shipping vessels began using the canal at Sturgeon Bay in the late 1800s, the deep harbor and ample wood supply of Sister Bay became an important stop
Marker detail: Employees of Roeser posed for this 1904 photo on company boats image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of the Sister Bay Historical Society
2. Marker detail: Employees of Roeser posed for this 1904 photo on company boats
Andrew Roeser purchased the pier and mills in 1878. Note the stacked logs in the background.
for log refueling. The community prospered and was incorporated as a village in 1912. That same year, however, tragedy struck as a great fire burned through the downtown.

”The Village of Sister Bay was practically destroyed by fire… four store buildings, a large hotel and residence being wiped out. Hundreds of people visited the scene of the conflagration the day following, coming from all parts of the county. Summer tourists shopping at Ephraim and Fish Creek were numerous and many took Kodak pictures of the ruins, which smoldered all the day after.”
- Door County Advocate, July 26, 1912


Steamships Bring Tourists
As lumbering declined, entrepreneurs opened restaurants, hotels, and stores to attract the ever increasing number of tourists in Door County. Steamboats carrying passengers replaced the shipping vessels loaded with timber.

(photo captions)
• Andrew Roeser purchased the pier and mills in 1878. Employees of Roeser posed for this 1904 photo on company boats. Note the stacked logs in the background.
• Downtown Sister Bay prior to the 1912 fire.
• Downtown Sister Bay the day after the 1912 fire. The buildings are still smoldering.
• Liberty Park Hotel, built in 1888 just north of the village, was the area’s first tourist resort. It is still open today.
• All photos are courtesy of
Marker detail: Swedish Lumberjacks image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of the Sister Bay Historical Society
3. Marker detail: Swedish Lumberjacks
the Sister Bay Historical Society.
 
Erected by Door County Coastal Byway, Federal Highway Administration, and Wisconsin Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 45° 11.294′ N, 87° 7.311′ W. Marker is in Sister Bay, Wisconsin, in Door County. Marker is on North Bay Shore Drive (State Highway 42) south of Mill Road, on the right when traveling north. Marker is located near the sidewalk, in the grassy lot on the east side of the highway. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2345 Mill Road, Sister Bay WI 54234, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Nature of Sister Bay (here, next to this marker); Anderson Dock (approx. 3.1 miles away); First Permanent Colony in Door County (approx. 3.3 miles away); A Road Less Traveled (approx. 4.1 miles away); Life on the Ledge (approx. 4.1 miles away); A State Park System is Formed (approx. 4.3 miles away); Niagara Escarpment (approx. 4.3 miles away); Ellison Bay (approx. 4.3 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This marker consists of two large, rectangular, composite plaques, mounted at eye-level, on the south-facing side of a heavy duty wooden-frame kiosk.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Door County Coastal Byway
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceParks & Recreational AreasSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Marker detail: Downtown Sister Bay - Before and After the 1912 Fire image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of the Sister Bay Historical Society
4. Marker detail: Downtown Sister Bay - Before and After the 1912 Fire
Welcome to the Door County Coastal Byway<br>(<i>adjacent panel; to left of marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 20, 2018
5. Welcome to the Door County Coastal Byway
(adjacent panel; to left of marker)
Discover the true spirit of Door County. Travel this scenic byway as it loops 66 miles along the Green Bay bluffs and through the dunes and bays of Lake Michigan. Explore lighthouses, nature preserves, and historic communities to discover Door County's unique sense of place.
Village of Sister Bay Marker Kiosk (<i>wide view looking north; Bay Shore Drive on left</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 20, 2018
6. Village of Sister Bay Marker Kiosk (wide view looking north; Bay Shore Drive on left)
 

More. Search the internet for Village of Sister Bay.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 6, 2019. This page originally submitted on March 1, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 86 times since then. Last updated on March 2, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 1, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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