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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Sharing the Circle

 
 
Sharing the Circle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, December 1, 2018
1. Sharing the Circle Marker
Inscription.  Sharing the Circle

The approximately one million objects in the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) collection were amassed by George Gustav Heye (1874-1957). The collection spans the Western Hemisphere from the Arctic to Tiera del Fuego and from California to the Caribbean. In 1989, through an act of Congress, NMAI became part of the Smithsonian Institution, the largest museum complex in the world.

NMAI’s George Gustav Heye Center, at the Alexander Hamilton US Custom House, is only one of the three sites comprising the museum. Plans are underway for a museum building near the Capitol in Washington, DC, which will be the public cornerstone of NMAI. Because of its immensity, however, much of the collection will reside in Suitland, Maryland, where objects will be housed, viewed, and used by native peoples for many purposes, including ceremonial rite and artistic reference.

Dedicated to educating the public about the diversity and vitality of native cultures throughout the western Hemisphere, the museum actively supports the involvement of native communities in the management of their own cultural resources.
Sharing the Circle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, December 1, 2018
2. Sharing the Circle Marker
The bank of markers to the right of the entrance.
A “Fourth Museum” exists in the form of outreach and training within native communities. Like a tree that draws its strength from many roots, the shape of the Fourth Museum is as varied and flexible as the needs and wished of native communities, tribal cultural centers, schools, libraries and individuals.
 
Location. 40° 42.266′ N, 74° 0.832′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Bowling Green and Broadway, on the left when traveling south on Bowling Green. Touch for map. The marker is one of several in a bank to the right of the main entrance to the National Museum of the American Indian. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10004, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. George Gustav Heye (here, next to this marker); Places of Exchange (here, next to this marker); American Merchant Marine (here, next to this marker); “North America” sculpted by Daniel Chester French (here, next to this marker); The Marketplace (here, next to this marker); Drawn To The City (a few steps from this marker); ...to Manhattan (within shouting distance of this marker); From Menatay... (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Categories. AnthropologyArts, Letters, MusicNative Americans
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, March 14, 2019
3. Inset
Gwa’ka’le’ka’la is the Kwakiutl word for the “three of life.” This design comes from a Northwest Coast button blanket which was acquired in the 1920’s and is part of the museum’s permanent collection.
Courtesy of the national Museum of the American Indian
Smithsonian Institution, #11/5129
The National Museum of the American Indian (and Federal Bankruptcy Court) image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, October 10, 2015
4. The National Museum of the American Indian (and Federal Bankruptcy Court)
Formerly the Alexander Hamilton Custom House. The marker bank is to the right of the entrance.
 
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Credits. This page was last revised on March 22, 2019. This page originally submitted on March 20, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 74 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 20, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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