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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Carter Farm

The Federal Counterattack

 
 
The Carter Farm - The Federal Counterattack Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
1. The Carter Farm - The Federal Counterattack Marker
Inscription.  Just before 4:30 P.M., when the bulk of Confederate Gen. Patrick Cleburne’s Division struck this part of the main Federal line, the 100th Ohio Infantry buckled under the pressure. Although Cleburne had been killed just south of here, his men slammed into the earthworks and some vaulted over them. The 100th Ohio Infantry quickly fell back, as did part of the 104th Ohio Infantry. Some of the 104th Ohio soldiers tenaciously held their ground, as did two guns of the 6th Ohio Battery near the Carter cotton gin. These units, as well as the 65th Indiana Infantry farther east, anchored the line and averted further collapse.

The Federal 12th Kentucky Infantry, 16th Kentucky Infantry, and 8th Tennessee Infantry were behind you in reserve. When the main line broke all three regiments charged forward to check the Confederate breakthrough, followed by the 175th Ohio Infantry, a new unit that had never been in combat. The reserves engaged the Southerners in bloody, hand-to-hand fighting and pushed many of them back outside the main line of works. More help arrived when three regiments of Col. Emerson Opdyke’s Brigade (sic) piled into this sector,
The Cotton Gin Site and Park image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
2. The Cotton Gin Site and Park
The marker is in the distance along the path.
and the two sides battled into the night. Several hundred Confederate soldiers surrendered as the fighting dragged on. Gen. Hiram B. Granbury, one of Cleburne’s brigade commanders, was killed not far west from here.

As Federal troops took full control of this area they began to fire west across Columbia Pike. From here they could sweep some of the area along the main line west of the road and Confederate losses continued to grow.


 
Erected by Historic Franklin Parks.
 
Location. 35° 54.973′ N, 86° 52.361′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is on Columbia Avenue near Strahl Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Cotton Gin Site and Park, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Carter Farm (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance
Inset image. Click for full size.
3. Inset
Pvt. William G. Bentley, 104th Ohio Infantry
of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); Main Entrenchment Federal Battle Line (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
4. Inset
Harvey, mascot of the 104th Ohio Infantry
Inset image. Click for full size.
5. Inset
Col. Daniel McCoy, 175th Ohio Infantry commander
Inset image. Click for full size.
6. Inset
Situation map
 

More. Search the internet for The Carter Farm.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 16, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 14, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 69 times since then. Last updated on September 16, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 14, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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