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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Winchester, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Shawnee Springs Hospital

 
 
Shawnee Springs Hospital Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 20, 2007
1. Shawnee Springs Hospital Marker
Inscription. Clearing and Evacuation Facility
Valley Campaigns

Federal medical authorities established the largest temporary hospital of the Civil War in the aftermath of the Third Battle of Winchester on September 19, 1864. Union Gen. Philip H. Sheridan's medical director, Surgeon James T. Ghiselin, on September 22, ordered Surgeon John H. Brinton to lay out a 4,000-bed facility. Brinton in turn ordered 500 tents and medical supplies for 5,000 patients that had been positioned at Northern rail yards, as well as 20 physicians. Since many public and private structures in Winchester were full of injured Confederates after the battle, the new hospital held Union casualties. Designated Sheridan Field Hospital, the huge facility extended from Shawnee Springs northward to Jacob Senseny's house on Church Ridge. Staff housing and administrative buildings occupied the high ground to your left. Surgeon James V.Z. Blaney assumed command of the hospital on September 28, after Brinton completed its layout.

The hospital quickly treated and evacuated more than 4,000 casualties then became a clearing and evacuation facility. It received patients from engagements farther south, processed them, and moved them to medical facilities in the North. With assistance from United States Sanitary Commission personnel, patients were clothed, fed, and
Map of Winchester Now and Then image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 20, 2007
2. Map of Winchester Now and Then
moved on, often in a few hours. The largest surge of patients came after the Battle of Cedar Creek on October 19, when the hospital evacuated 3,400 men between October 23 and 31. Its population dwindled rapidly thereafter, and it sent off its last patient on December 28. The hospital closed on January 4, 1865.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 10.274′ N, 78° 9.694′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia. Marker is on Opequon Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located in the Shawnee Springs Preserve. From South Pleasant Valley Road, head west on Hollingsworth Drive. From the intersection of Opequon Avenue, turn south. The trail head is on the right. Marker is in this post office area: Winchester VA 22601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Abramís Delight (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Hollingsworth Family Settlement (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Abramís Delight (approx. 0.2 miles away); Patsy Cline: Country Music Singer (approx.
Entrance to the Shawnee Springs Preserve image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 20, 2007
3. Entrance to the Shawnee Springs Preserve
The kiosk on the left has a map of the area noting the locations of some traces of the hospital. Shallow pits are all that remain from where the tents once stood.
half a mile away); First Battle of Winchester (approx. 0.6 miles away); General Daniel Morgan / Winchester (approx. 0.8 miles away); Alabama (approx. 0.8 miles away); South Carolina (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
More about this marker. On the lower right is a map of "Winchester, Then and Now. The dark lines and squares show Civil War-era roads and buildings. Lighter lines are postwar roads. The shaded area is where the immense Sheridan Field Hospital stood. More information about historic Winchester can be obtained at the visitors center at Abrams Delight."

In the upper center are portaits of John H. Brinton (1832-1907) and James T. Ghiselin (1829-1896). On the upper right is a drawing of "Thanksgiving 1864-Raising the Flag at Sheridan Field Hospital" by J.E. Taylor.
 
Also see . . .  Conditions in Civil War Field Hospitals. (Submitted on October 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Shawnee Springs Preserve Living History Area image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 20, 2007
4. The Shawnee Springs Preserve Living History Area
Living historians hold events here during the summer months bringing to life the medical practices used during the Civil War.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,636 times since then and 117 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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