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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Louisville in Jefferson County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

George Rogers Clark

(1752-1818)

 
 
George Rogers Clark Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2000
1. George Rogers Clark Marker
Side 1
Inscription.  
Side 1
After fall of Ruddle's and Martin's stations, Clark led expeditions against Indians in 1780 and 1782. In later years Clark was plagued by poor health and war debts incurred for his country. He died at Locust Grove, his sister's home. Buried in Cave Hill Cem., 1869. Outpost he founded grew into Louisville.

Side 2
In 1776, Clark, delegate to VA. Gen. Assembly, prompted recognition of Ky. as a county of Va. By 1778, he set up outpost on Corn Island, at Falls of Ohio, from which he launched invasion of Northwest. He captured three British forts, reduced Indian power, and crippled English strategy, thus helping secure territory for U.S.
 
Erected 1984 by Kentucky Historical Society Kentucky Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 1753.)
 
Topics and series. This memorial is listed in these topic lists: ExplorationSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian. In addition, it is included in the Kentucky Historical Society series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1780.
 
Location. 38° 14.604′ N, 85° 

George Rogers Clark Marker image. Click for full size.
By Pat Filippone, November 25, 2016
2. George Rogers Clark Marker
Side 2
Click or scan to see
this page online
43.038′ W. Marker is in Louisville, Kentucky, in Jefferson County. The marker is located in Cave Hill Cemetery, Section P, Lot 245. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 701 Baxter Avenue, Louisville KY 40204, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Artist of Confederacy (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Governor Thomas E. Bramlette (about 600 feet away); Sister Emily Cooper (approx. 0.3 miles away); James Guthrie (1792-1869) (approx. 0.3 miles away); This monument to the memory of James Guthrie (approx. 0.3 miles away); Nathaniel Wolfe (approx. 0.4 miles away); A National Cemetery System (approx. 0.4 miles away); Cave Hill National Cemetery (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Louisville.
 
George Rogers Clark Marker and grave image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2000
3. George Rogers Clark Marker and grave
G.R.C. - Clark's Grave image. Click for full size.
circa 1891
4. G.R.C. - Clark's Grave
“There is a grass-grown grave in a burial-ground in Louisville, Kentucky, which has a small headstone marked with the letters G. R. C. and nothing more; that is the grave of General George Rogers Clark, the man who did more to get the west for us -- or what was called the west a hundred years ago.” – D. H. Montgomery in The Beginner's American History, 1891.
General George Rogers Clark Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2000
5. General George Rogers Clark Grave Marker
Perry Wilkes-Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2000
6. Perry Wilkes-Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient
He is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery, Section P, Lot 866. He was in the Union Navy and was awarded the medal for action on May 5, 1864 at Red River LA
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 31, 2019. It was originally submitted on April 7, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 499 times since then and 3 times this year. Last updated on January 2, 2017, by Pat Filippone of Stockton, California. Photos:   1. submitted on April 7, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland.   2. submitted on January 2, 2017, by Pat Filippone of Stockton, California.   3. submitted on April 7, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland.   4. submitted on May 31, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   5, 6. submitted on April 7, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 14, 2021