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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Augusta in Richmond County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

James Ryder Randall

1839 — 1908

 
 
James Ryder Randall Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2008
1. James Ryder Randall Marker
Inscription.  
"Better the fire upon thee roll,
Better the blade, the shot, the bowl,
Than Crucifixion of the soul,
Maryland! My Maryland!"

 
Erected 1936 by The Randall Memorial Committee of Chapter "A" United Daughters of the Confederacy Augusta Georgia.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Arts, Letters, MusicCommunicationsWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy series list.
 
Location. 33° 28.62′ N, 81° 58.621′ W. Marker is in Augusta, Georgia, in Richmond County. Marker is on Greene Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Augusta GA 30901, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Curtis Baptist Church (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Meadow Garden (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Meadow Garden (approx. ¼ mile away); George Walton (approx. ¼ mile away); American Gold Star Mothers Tribute (approx.
James Ryder Randall Marker, North face image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. James Ryder Randall Marker, North face
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0.3 miles away); Springfield Baptist Church Birthplace of Morehouse College (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Augusta Canal (approx. 0.4 miles away); Ware High School (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Augusta.
 
Regarding James Ryder Randall. James Ryder Randall, a 22-year-old Baltimore native teaching English literature at Poydras College in Pointe-Coupee, Louisiana, was outraged at the news of Union troops being marched through his home town. This incident stirred Randall’s Southern sympathies, inspiring him to write a poem said to be American’s "most martial poem." Maryland, My Maryland was first published in the April 26, 1861 edition of the New Orleans Delta.

The poem, the best known of all Randall's poetry, quickly found its way back to Baltimore where it was eventually set to the familiar music of O Tannenbaum [O Christmas Tree]. It became instantly popular and the most famous war song of the Confederacy.

After the war was over in 1865, Randall served several positions with various newspapers. His final post was as an editor and correspondent for the Augusta Chronicle. He died in Augusta, Georgia January 15, 1908.

Maryland,
Portrait of James Ryder Randall image. Click for full size.
3. Portrait of James Ryder Randall
Detail from postcard, Jack Kelbaugh Collection of Civil War Photographs, MSA SC4325-52, Maryland State Archives
My Maryland
has nine stanzas. The passage on this monument is from the eighth stanza. Randall's poem was adopted as the Maryland State song in 1939 (Chapter 451, Acts of 1939; Code State Government Article, sec. 13-307).
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. The use of “Maryland, My Maryland” during the war is discussed on this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Maryland, My Maryland. The poem (here) is sung to the traditional tune of "Lauriger Horatius" ("O, Tannenbaum"). (Submitted on August 10, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 21, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 10, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,778 times since then and 57 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 10, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on August 11, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 3, 2022