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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Valladolid, Yucatán, Mexico — The Southeast (Yucatan Peninsula)
 

First Steam-Powered Textile Mill

 
 
First Steam-Powered Textile Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. Makali Bruton, January 16, 2017
1. First Steam-Powered Textile Mill Marker
Inscription.  
Primera Fábrica Textil Movida por Vapor
La “Aurora Yucateca” fue la primera fábrica en México impulsada por las nuevas y modernas máquinas de vapor. La industria textil en Valladolid fue otro sustento económico de la región en el primer tercio del siglo XIX. El éxito del cultivo de algodón y su transformación en productos terminales por talleres artesanales fue el antecedente de la instalación en la ciudad de la primera fábrica de hilados y tejidos de algodón movida por vapor en el país. Por esta razón su propietario y fundador, Don Pedro Sainz de Baranda, la denomino: “La Aurora de la Industria Yucateca”.

Laboró de 1833 a 1845. En enero de 1847 la fábrica fue incendiada cuando los mayas y gente de los barrios atacaron el centro de la ciudad. La “Aurora” ha sido, en casi 100 años, sede de cuarteles militares, penitenciaria, escuela secundaria y a partir de 1981 ha sido rescatada y transformada en un recinto cultural cuyas paredes son las evidencias actuales de la grandeza de “La Aurora de la Industria Yucateca”.

English:
First Steam-Powered Textile Mill
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"La Aurora Yucateca" was the first factory in Mexico powered by the new and modern steam machines. The textile industry in Valladolid was an economic pillar for the region in the first third of the 19th Century. The success of cotton growth and its transformation in finished product by artisan shops were the precedent to the installation in the city of the first cotton yarns and fabric factory powered by steam in the country. For this reason its owner and founder, Don Pedro Sainz de Baranda named it “La Aurora de la Industria Yucateca” (The Dawn of Yucatecan Industry).

It worked from 1833 to 1845. In January 1847 the factory was burned down when the Mayans and neighborhood people attacked the city center. In the next 100 years “La Aurora” would be military headquarters, penitenciary, secondary school and, since 1981, it has been restored into a cultural precinct, whose walls are the current evidence of the greatness of “La Aurora de la Industria Yucateca”.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesWars, Non-US. A significant historical month for this entry is January 1847.
 
Location. 20° 41.592′ N, 88° 12.176′ W. Marker is in Valladolid, Yucatán. Marker is on Calle 35 just west of Calle 42, on the right when traveling west.
First Steam-Powered Textile Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. Makali Bruton, January 16, 2017
2. First Steam-Powered Textile Mill Marker
The buttressed building behind the wall is what was once the Aurora Factory.
The marker is along the exterior wall of what was once the Aurora Factory, along a pedestrian walkway that is an extension of Calle 35. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Valladolid YU 97780, Mexico. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Park of the Neighborhood of the Candelaria (about 120 meters away, measured in a direct line); Fiesta de la Candelaria (about 120 meters away); Birth House of Delio Moreno Cantón (about 180 meters away); House of Governor Francisco Canton Rosado (about 180 meters away); The Valladolid Artisans' Market (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); The Catholic Parsonage of Valladolid (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Regional Artisans' Center “Zací” (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Francisco Cantón Rosado Park (approx. 0.3 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Valladolid.
 
Additional commentary.
1. John Masterson Burke
John Masterson Burke (1812-1909) of New York traveled to Valladolid to work for the Aurora Factory as an engineer and manager in 1835. He worked there for seven years, leaving before the beginning of the Caste Wars and the destruction of the factory. He went on to use his experiences in Mexico in other ventures, primarily in the sugar industry in Cuba. He later was a major philanthropic contributor to the Winifred Masterson Burke Rehabilitation Hospital in White Plains, New
The Aurora Textile Mill today image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. Makali Bruton, January 16, 2017
3. The Aurora Textile Mill today
The factory is now a cultural center and public library. The marker to the right of the entrance commemorates the establishment of the cultural center and plaza in March, 1981 and its dedication by Mexican President José López Portillo.
York, named for his mother.
    — Submitted March 5, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Accra, Ghana.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 13, 2020. It was originally submitted on March 5, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Accra, Ghana. This page has been viewed 181 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 5, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Accra, Ghana.

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Feb. 27, 2024