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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Spotsylvania Courthouse in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Spotsylvania Campaign

 
 
Spotsylvania Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, July 6, 2008
1. Spotsylvania Campaign Marker
Inscription.  May 9-14, 1864. The village of Spotsylvania Court House, two miles farther down the Brock Road, became of utmost temporary importance, since it now protected Lee's communications with Richmond. As the Confederates threw up earthworks around the village, the Federals threatened the western defenses from this area. The Federal right was first held by Hancock's II Corps. Next in line came Warren's V Corps, and then Wright's (formerly Sedgwick's) VI. The flanks of Warren and Wright joined here at the Brock Road. In the progress of the battle, the emphasis of attack swung eastward and southward causing ultimate abandonment of this front.
 
Erected by United States Department of the Interior - National Park Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical year for this entry is 1864.
 
Location. 38° 13.082′ N, 77° 36.862′ W. Marker is near Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker is at the intersection of Grant Drive and Brock Road (County Route 613), on the right when traveling north on Grant
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Drive. Located at the west entrance to Spotsylvania Battlefield unit of the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8116 Brock Rd, Spotsylvania VA 22553, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Spotsylvania Campaign (here, next to this marker); Laurel Hill Trail (a few steps from this marker); The Death of Sedgwick (a few steps from this marker); Sedgwick (a few steps from this marker); The Race for Spotsylvania Court House (a few steps from this marker); Laurel Hill (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Death of Sedgwick (within shouting distance of this marker); A Different Kind of War (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Spotsylvania Courthouse.
 
Situation May 8-10, 1864 image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, July 6, 2008
2. Situation May 8-10, 1864
Note the north seeking arrow points to the bottom of the map. Double click the photo to see more detail of the map.
Warren and Wright failed to break Anderson's line. Ewell's Corps and Hill's Corps (temporarily under Early) extended the Confederate trenches eastward and southward. Burnside's Corps failed to reach Spotsylvania from the east. Hancock attacked Lee's left but was recalled.
West Entrance to Spotsylvania Battlefield image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain
3. West Entrance to Spotsylvania Battlefield
Two Department of the Interior markers, with an interpretive map, stand next to a painting depicting the death of Sedgwick.
Hancock and Heth Battle on May 10 image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, August 24, 2008
4. Hancock and Heth Battle on May 10
On May 9, Hancock's II Corps attempted to flank the Confederate lines near the Po River (to the west of the modern battlefield park) as far as the Block House Bridge (along Modern CR 608). On the morning of the 10th, while Hancock's men were retiring to align Warren's Corps to the east, they were attacked by Heth's Confederate division. The fighting took place across the open ground to the north (left of this photo) of CR 608.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,057 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on August 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

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Jun. 23, 2024