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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

The National Mall in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Washington City Canal on the Tiber Creek

 
 
Washington City Canal on the Tiber Creek Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, July 21, 2017
1. Washington City Canal on the Tiber Creek Marker
Inscription.  Beginning in 1815, a water transport canal was opened joining the Potomac river and the Anacostia river, then known as the Eastern Branch. The Washington Canal brought building supplies for construction of many buildings in the young city. The canal was built mostly by Irish stone masons, but much of the labor is believed to have been by enslaved African Americans and freemen of color. The canal stones on display were unearthed as part of the water main excavation for the National Museum of African American History and Culture. The canal was poorly maintained and beginning in 1871 was covered over by Constitution Avenue. The illustrations of the canal were by Seth Eastman, a military officer and illustrator, who sketched from the canal site during his visits to Washington D.C. in the 1850s.
 
Erected by Smithsonian Institution.
 
Location. 38° 53.517′ N, 77° 2.011′ W. Marker is in The National Mall, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of 15th Street Northwest and Constitution Avenue Northwest
Washington City Canal image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse
2. Washington City Canal
(U.S. 50), on the right when traveling north on 15th Street Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1500 Constitution Avenue Northwest, Washington DC 20560, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Washington Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Live Oaks: A Gathering Place (within shouting distance of this marker); Bulfinch Gate House (within shouting distance of this marker); Live Oaks: Specimens of Global, Scholarly and Public Research (within shouting distance of this marker); Live Oaks: A Symbol of Strength (within shouting distance of this marker); Sheltering Branches (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Completing the Triangle (about 700 feet away); Boy Scout Memorial (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in The National Mall.
 
Also see . . .
1. What's Left of the Washington City Canal?. (Submitted on July 24, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.)
2. The Washington Canal: Cesspool in the Midst of the Nation's Capital. (Submitted on July 24, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.)
 
Categories. African AmericansMan-Made FeaturesWaterways & Vessels
 
Washington City Canal on the Tiber Creek Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, July 21, 2017
3. Washington City Canal on the Tiber Creek Marker
Canal Stones on left.
Washington City Canal on the Tiber Creek Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, July 21, 2017
4. Washington City Canal on the Tiber Creek Marker
National Museum of African American History and Culture in background.
Marker along 15th Street NW image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 15, 2017
5. Marker along 15th Street NW
Washington City Canal - 1860 image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse
6. Washington City Canal - 1860
 

More. Search the internet for Washington City Canal on the Tiber Creek.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 17, 2019. This page originally submitted on July 24, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 159 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 24, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.   5. submitted on December 15, 2017, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   6. submitted on July 24, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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