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Fredericksburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Stating Inalienable Rights

City of Fredericksburg, Virginia

 
 
Stating Inalienable Rights Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 2, 2007
1. Stating Inalienable Rights Marker
Inscription.  On October 7, 1776, three months after the Continental Congress had adopted the Declaration of Independence, the Virginia Assembly held its first session, in Williamsburg. The Assembly appointed Thomas Jefferson and four delegates to a Committee of Law Revisors, to adapt Virginia’s existing laws to the principles of its new government.

From January 13-17, 1777, the committee met in Fredericksburg to divide up this massive task. George Mason joined the initial discussions, but left the committee’s three attorneys – Jefferson, George Wythe, and Edmund Pendleton – to draft the new statutes. The fifth member, Thomas Ludwell Lee, soon took ill and died.

The Committee took just over two years to complete their work. In June 1779, they presented 126 statutes to the Assembly, for consideration and adoption. Jefferson considered the Bill for Religious Freedom (enacted in 1786) to be one of his finest achievements.
 
Erected by City of Fredericksburg.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Government & Politics
Stating Inalienable Rights Marker on William & Caroline Streets image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, September 4, 2008
2. Stating Inalienable Rights Marker on William & Caroline Streets
Notable EventsWar, US Revolutionary.
 
Location. 38° 18.223′ N, 77° 27.577′ W. Marker is in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of William Street (U.S. 3) and Caroline Street on William Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Weedon’s Tavern (here, next to this marker); Seeking Civil Rights (here, next to this marker); Lewis Randolph Ball (within shouting distance of this marker); First Town Hall / Market House (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Town Hall / Market House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Market Square (within shouting distance of this marker); Lease Land (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of Barton House (about 400 feet away); Prisoners of Christ (about 400 feet away); Fredericksburg Baptist Church (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Revising Virginia’s Legal Code. Chapter 10 of the 1834 biography The Life of Thomas Jefferson by B. L. Rayner. (Submitted on June 2, 2007.) 

2. Jefferson's Bill for Establishing Religious Freedom in State of Virginia. Eyler Robert Coates, Sr.’s Site (Submitted on June 2, 2007.)
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Credits. This page was last revised on July 14, 2019. It was originally submitted on June 2, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,406 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on June 2, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on September 4, 2008, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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Apr. 8, 2020