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Camden in Kershaw County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Monument to Kershaw County’s Confederate Dead

 
 
Monument to Kershaw County’s Confederate Dead Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, November 4, 2017
1. Monument to Kershaw County’s Confederate Dead Marker
Inscription.  
In 1883, the Ladies Memorial Association of Camden unveiled this monument dedicated to Kershaw County’s Confederate War dead. Confederate General John Doby Kennedy of Camden laid the cornerstone with a Masonic trowel once used by Revolutionary War General the Marquis de Lafayette to lay the cornerstone of the Baron DeKalb Monument in 1825. Wade Hampton, III, U.S. Senator, former governor of South Carolina, and a general in the Confederate Army, delivered the ovation to a crowd of thousands.
The Ladies Memorial Association grew out of the ladies aid societies prevalent during the Civil War. After the South’s defeat, they came together to “protect and cherish the graves of our Confederate dead.” These women – many of them widows, orphans, or sweethearts of the dead soldiers they honored – placed wreaths upon soldier’s graves every Confederate Memorial day, cared for their burial places, and raised funds for monuments in their honor. In Camden, the Ladies Memorial Association persevered for more than ten years to collect the funds for this monument.
When first erected, this monument stood in the center of Monument
Monument to Kershaw County’s Confederate Dead Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, November 4, 2017
2. Monument to Kershaw County’s Confederate Dead Marker
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Square. In the 1880s, Monument Square measured 700 feet square and neither Broad nor Laurens Streets extended into the park. In 1910, the park was quartered when both streets were paved, but the monument still stood in the center of the area. In 1950, the city moved the Monument to its present location.
 
Erected by City of Camden.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Lafayette’s Farewell Tour series list.
 
Location. 34° 15.063′ N, 80° 36.486′ W. Marker is in Camden, South Carolina, in Kershaw County. Marker is on Broad Street (U.S. 521), on the left when traveling north. Marker is located in the southwest portion of Monument Square. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Camden SC 29020, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Confederate War Memorial (here, next to this marker); Camden (within shouting distance of this marker); Action at Logtown (within shouting distance of this marker); In Honor and Rememberance (within shouting distance of this marker); The Americans Return (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Monument to Lt. Col. James Polk Dickinson (about 300 feet away); James Polk Dickinson
Confederate Dead Monument image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, November 4, 2017
3. Confederate Dead Monument
The marker can be seen to the left of the monument.
(about 400 feet away); Samuel Mathis House (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Camden.
 
More about this marker. A photograph of the monument at the top left of the marker contains a caption of “On Memorial day May 10th the corner stone of the Confederate Monument was laid with Masonic honors . . . ”
Another photograph on the right side of the marker includes the caption “The southwest quadrant of Monument Square, prior to the placing of the Confederate Monument, showing a crowd gathered at a political rally, c 1912.” Both photos courtesy of the Camden Archives & Museum.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 10, 2017. It was originally submitted on November 10, 2017, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 306 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 10, 2017, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.

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Aug. 9, 2022