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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Marshall in Harrison County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant

 
 
Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
1. Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant Marker
Inscription.  Italian-born Charles Ginocchio arrived in Marshall in 1871. He owned several properties near the T & P Railroad Depot, including the site of a notorious 1879 shooting that left Maurice Barrymore wounded and fellow actor Ben Porter Dead. In 1893-96 Ginocchio commissioned this three-store brick building with first-floor stores, café, lobby, ballroom and dining room, and forty hotel rooms on the upper floors. The foundation is of ironstone, and the interior includes rare hand-carved curly pine detailing. In the late 1960’s, the Camargo Corporation and the Max C. Gaines family restored the building and saved it from demolition.
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1971

 
Erected 1971 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 10164.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureIndustry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesRailroads & Streetcars.
 
Location. 32° 33.089′ N, 94° 22.048′ W. Marker is in Marshall, Texas, in
Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
2. Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant Marker (wide view)
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Harrison County. Marker is on North Washington Avenue 0.1 miles north of Ginocchio Street, on the left when traveling north. Marker and associated "Official Historical Medallion" are mounted on front wall of subject building, eye-level at the left side of the entrance door. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 701 N Washington Ave, Marshall TX 75670, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Marshall (here, next to this marker); Texas & Pacific Depot (a few steps from this marker); Ginocchio-Cook-Pedison House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Allen House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of The Confederate Hat Factory in Marshall, C.S.A. (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Marshall Masonic Female Institute (approx. ¼ mile away); Sam Houston's 1857 Campaign in Marshall (approx. ¼ mile away); Telegraph Park (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Marshall.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ginocchio Hotel.
The focal point of the Ginocchio Historic District, the Ginocchio Hotel, was built and designed by C.G. Lancaster in 1896 for Charles A. Ginocchio. The establishment of the railroad in Marshall resulted in rapid growth within the county and became a hub for transportation, replacing the riverboat transportation in Jefferson. After the Texas and Pacific Railroad relocated its main shops from Hallsville to Marshall in 1873 and expanded its lines, many people moved into the
Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant (<i>corner view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
3. Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant (corner view)
surrounding area hoping to achieve financial success in the newly rising economy. The first floor contained a ballroom, several shops, and a restaurant, the second floor held thirty rooms, and the third floor contained ten rooms. The hotel remained in business until 1968 when it was briefly closed for remodeling, before being re-opened to serve as a restaurant only (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant.
The Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant is located at 700 North Washington Ave., across the tracks from the train depot in Marshall. Local entrepreneur Charles Ginocchio hired architect C. G. Lancaster to design the hotel and oversee its construction, which was completed in 1896. The structure is noted for the interior paneling and staircase of rare curly pine and other rare innovations. The hotel has undergone restoration and various uses since the heyday of railroad travel. The small brick building in the foreground is the AMTRAK ticket office. Passengers descend through a tunnel under the tracks to reach the depot (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant (<i>tower/cupola</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
4. Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant (tower/cupola)
Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant (<i>wide view showing store fronts below hotel rooms</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
5. Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant (wide view showing store fronts below hotel rooms)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 1, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 190 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 1, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 21, 2021