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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

The National Mall in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lock Keeper’s House

Formerly the Eastern Terminal of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal

 

— Erected about 1835 —

 
Lock Keeper's House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, March 25, 2006
1. Lock Keeper's House Marker
Inscription.  The canal passed along the present line of B Street in front of this house emptying into Tiber Creek and the Potomac River.
 
Erected 1928 by Office of Public Buildings and Public Parks.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Notable BuildingsWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal series list.
 
Location. 38° 53.518′ N, 77° 2.385′ W. Marker is in The National Mall, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Constitution Avenue Northwest (U.S. 50) and 17th Street Northwest, on the right when traveling east on Constitution Avenue Northwest. Plaque is affixed to the Lockkeeper's House, facing Constitution Avenue Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20006, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Canal Connection (here, next to this marker); The Washington City Canal (here, next to this marker); Bulfinch Gate House (within shouting distance of this marker); Inuksuk
Lock Keeper's House image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, March 25, 2006
2. Lock Keeper's House
This is the south side of the house, facing the Mall.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Gabriela Mistral (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pablo Neruda (about 300 feet away); Ysabel I, La Catolica (about 300 feet away); The Home of the Pan American Union (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in The National Mall.
 
Regarding Lock Keeper’s House. Constitution Avenue is today's name for B Street mentioned on the plaque. Tiber Creek has been filled and its source diverted into the city's drainage system. The C&O Canal now empties into Rock Creek about a mile northwest of here.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lockkeeper's House. (Submitted on March 28, 2006.)
2. C&O Canal Association - Articles. (Submitted on March 28, 2006.)
 
Lock Keeper's House image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, March 25, 2006
3. Lock Keeper's House
Photographer is standing on the sidewalk on Constitution Avenue. This marker can be seen to the left of the door. The Washington City Canal Marker can be seen on the stone in the foreground.
Lock Keeper’s House and Canal Connection Markers image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2008
4. Lock Keeper’s House and Canal Connection Markers
At the north side of the Lock Keeper's House.
Lock Keeper’s House - viewed from across Constitution Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 4, 2011
5. Lock Keeper’s House - viewed from across Constitution Avenue
Note the National Mall Levee project, under construction in rear - the Washington Monument, east of 17th Street at far left.
Sign outside construction image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 15, 2017
6. Sign outside construction

Lockkeeper's House
is moving...
only 50 feet
Sign outside construction image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 15, 2017
7. Sign outside construction

The oldest structure on the National Mall will be
relocated & restored
with a new visitor-friendly entrance and dramatic exhibits
South side of Lock Keeper’s House facing the Mall after relocation and restoration image. Click for full size.
By Yuhan Zhang, August 18, 2018
8. South side of Lock Keeper’s House facing the Mall after relocation and restoration
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2019. It was originally submitted on March 28, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 10,963 times since then and 56 times this year. Last updated on December 15, 2017, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 28, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   4. submitted on August 12, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on September 8, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6, 7. submitted on December 15, 2017, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   8. submitted on December 17, 2018, by Bernard H. Berne of Arlington, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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