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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Historic Preservation in Georgetown

 
 
Historic Preservation in Georgetown Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
1. Historic Preservation in Georgetown Marker
Inscription.  
Georgetown citizens have been central to preserving Georgetown's important historic houses. Three of these houses, built at the turn of the 19th century on large plots of land overlooking the port, are now accessible to the public and are testaments to the rich architectural heritage of Georgetown.

Built in 1800, Dumbarton Oaks, 3101 R Street, was purchased by former diplomat Robert Woods Bliss and his wife Mildred in 1920. They restored the run-down houses and added the gardens designed by renowned landscape architect Beatrix Farrand.

In 1923, inspired by the Blisses, fellow diplomat Ferdinand Lammot Belin saved Evermay, 1623 28th Street, from demolition for apartment house construction. Belin restored Evermay's 18th-century Georgian character by removing Victorian additions. Evermay became home to three generations of Belins.

Dumbarton House, 2715 Q Street, was built in 1798. In 1915, when the Dumbarton Bridge was built over Rock Creek, the house was moved 100 feet to accommodate the extension of Q Street into Georgetown. The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America purchased and restored the
Historic Preservation in Georgetown Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
2. Historic Preservation in Georgetown Marker
house in 1928.

Tudor Place, 1644 31st Street, was built by Martha Washington's granddaughter, Martha Custis Peter and her husband, Thomas, who bought the land with a legacy of $8,000 from George Washington. Designed by William Thornton, architect of the U.S. Capitol, Tudor Place was home to six generations of the Peter family. In 1966, Armistead Peter III became the first private home owner to grant the nation's first scenic easement to protect historic property.

Georgetown citizens were instrumental in persuading Congress to pass the Old Georgetown Act in 1950, creating the Georgetown Historic District.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Notable BuildingsWaterways & VesselsWomen. In addition, it is included in the DC, Art on Call series list.
 
Location. 38° 54.402′ N, 77° 3.675′ W. Marker is in Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia. Marker is at the intersection of 31st Street Northwest and N Street Northwest, on the left when traveling north on 31st Street Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3100 N Street Northwest, Washington DC 20007, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tayloe / Snyder House (within shouting distance of this marker); John Lutz
Historic Preservation in Georgetown Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
3. Historic Preservation in Georgetown Marker
(about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 5 Congress at Oak Alley (about 400 feet away); John Laird (about 400 feet away); Georgetown's Watering Holes (about 500 feet away); Dumbarton United Methodist Church (about 500 feet away); Old Stone House (about 600 feet away); The Cornerstone of the Original Christ Church (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 18, 2020. It was originally submitted on February 2, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 110 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 2, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Aug. 7, 2020