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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fredericksburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
REMOVED
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Hostages

 
 
Hostages Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dawn Bowen, June 5, 2007
1. Hostages Marker
Inscription.  In the summer of 1862, Confederate authorities imprisoned four Union men from Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County. The arrested Unionists were local citizens in good standing, but who refused to renounce their allegiance to the United States. They were imprisoned in Richmond for disloyalty to the Confederacy.

In July and August, Federal authorities retaliated by rounding up nineteen local men, holding them briefly at the Farmers Bank (now the National Bank of Fredericksburg, two blocks to your right), and then sending them to the Old Capitol Prison in Washington, D.C. The Federal response was heavy handed, but the arrest of prominent citizens, including Mayor Montgomery Slaughter and Reverend William Broaddus, had the desired effect and an exchange of hostages came about within two months.

The Old Capitol Prison was initially a Washington D.C. boarding house. Located at the corner of First and A Streets, NE, it had served as the nationís capitol building (hence the name) after British troops sacked the city during the War of 1812. John Quincy Adams was sworn in as the nationís president there and John C. Calhoun had
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lived and died there. It became a holding facility for temporary prisoners during the Civil War. The U.S. Supreme Court sits in the site today.
 
Erected by City of Fredericksburg.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #06 John Quincy Adams series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1862.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 38° 18.247′ N, 77° 27.682′ W. Marker was in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Marker was at the intersection of Princess Anne Street and Amelia Street, on the right when traveling south on Princess Anne Street. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Fredericksburg Baptist Church (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Hostages (here, next to this marker); 1817 (within shouting distance of this marker); Prisoners of Christ (within shouting distance of this marker); The Jarrell Ministry Center (within shouting distance of this marker); 1834 (within shouting distance of this marker); The Booth House
Church damaged in Battle of Fredericksburg image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dawn Bowen, June 4, 2007
2. Church damaged in Battle of Fredericksburg
(within shouting distance of this marker); 1871 (within shouting distance of this marker); c. 1740s (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 1824 (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. New Marker At This Location also titled "Hostages".
 
Fredericksburg Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dawn Bowen, June 4, 2007
3. Fredericksburg Baptist Church
William F. Broaddus & Montgomery Slaughter image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, March 12, 2012
4. William F. Broaddus & Montgomery Slaughter
Close-up of photos on marker
Old Capitol Prison image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, March 12, 2012
5. Old Capitol Prison
was initially a Washington D. C. boarding house. Located at the corner of First and A Streets, NE, it had served as the nation's capitol building (hence the name) after British troops sacked the city during the War of 1812. John Quincy Adams was sworn in as the nation's president there and John C. Calhoun had lived and died there. It became a holding facility for temporary prisoners during the Civil War. The U.S. Supreme Court sits on the site today.
Close-up of stereogram on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 2, 2023. It was originally submitted on June 5, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,441 times since then and 34 times this year. Last updated on June 11, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 5, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on July 27, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 17, 2024