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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fairfax in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Ox Hill

The Death of Generals Stevens and Kearny

 

— Second Manassas Campaign —

 
The Battle of Ox Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 16, 2006
1. The Battle of Ox Hill Marker
Inscription.  The Battle of Ox Hill (or Chantilly) was fought here, in rain and storm, on September 1, 1862. It was a bloody aftermath following the Second Battle of Manassas (August 28-30) where the Union Army under Gen. John Pope was defeated and driven across Bull Run by the Confederate forces of Robert E. Lee.

Pope retreated to Centreville seven miles west of here. To turn Pope's position, Lee sent Stonewall Jackson moving around Pope via the Little River Turnpike (Route 50) in order to cut the Union line of retreat near Fairfax. Pope learned of this movement, ordered troops to Germantown, and sent the IX Corps, including Gen. Issac Stevens' division, to block Jackson at the Turnpike.

About 4 p.m. September 1, as storm clouds gathered, Stevens attacked Jackson's column at Ox Hill. A fierce battle ensued as a violent thunderstorm lashed the combatants with high winds and rain. Stevens was shot through the head and killed. As Stevens's troops fell back, Gen. Philip Kearny brought up several brigades of III Corps troops and attacked Jackson's right. The attack faltering, Kearny rode forward in the rain and gloom to reconnoiter, found himself
Closeup of Map Reproduced on Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 18, 2006
2. Closeup of Map Reproduced on Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
in the Confederate lines, was shot from his horse and killed. Darkness halted further fighting.

About 500 Confederate troops and perhaps 1,000 Union troops were killed or wounded. The Union army retreated during the night to Alexandria and the defenses of Washington. On September 3, Lee's army moved towards Leesburg and the Potomac River fords. Lee's army entered Maryland September 4-7. The Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam) was fought September 17, ending Lee's Maryland adventure.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails series list. A significant historical month for this entry is September 1862.
 
Location. 38° 51.927′ N, 77° 22.229′ W. Marker is near Fairfax, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker is at the intersection of Monument Drive and Monument Court, on the left when traveling west on Monument Drive. Marker is at entrance to Ox Hill Battlefield Park one block west of West Ox Road (County Route 608). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Annandale VA 22003, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Battle of Ox Hill (here, next to this marker); Maryland (Antietam / Sharpsburg) Campaign (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named
The Battle of Ox Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2014
3. The Battle of Ox Hill Marker
The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fairfax.
 
More about this marker. One of the series of Virginia Civil War Trails markers. This one is on the Second Manassas Campaign.
 
Also see . . .
1. Major General Isaac Ingalls Stevens. (Submitted on February 19, 2006.)
2. Major General Philip Kearny. (Submitted on February 19, 2006.)
3. Battle of Chantilly, or Ox Hill. Civil War Preservation Trust resource page for the battle. Includes an animated map. (Submitted on September 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
The Three Markers at Ox Hill Battlefield Park image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 16, 2006
4. The Three Markers at Ox Hill Battlefield Park
Plaque on the Stevens Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 18, 2006
5. Plaque on the Stevens Monument
Here fell Major General Issac Ingalls Stevens, with the Flag of the Republic in his dying grasp. September 1, 1862.
Plaque on the Kearny Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 18, 2006
6. Plaque on the Kearny Monument
Major General Philip Kearny killed on this spot September 1, 1862. The tribute of Kearny's First New Jersey Brigage and friends.
The Death of Isaac Stevens image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 31, 2014
7. The Death of Isaac Stevens
Close-up of image on marker
Stevens and Kearny Monuments image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 18, 2006
8. Stevens and Kearny Monuments
Their last names are chiseled on the opposite side of the stones.
Stevens and Kearny Monuments image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 19, 2016
9. Stevens and Kearny Monuments
Their last names are chiseled on the back sides.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 26, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 19, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 4,147 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 19, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.   2. submitted on March 18, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.   3. submitted on April 18, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.   4. submitted on February 17, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.   5, 6. submitted on March 18, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.   7. submitted on August 15, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   8. submitted on March 18, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.   9. submitted on February 17, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia.

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Jun. 16, 2021