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Seneca in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Veteran’s Life in Montgomery County

post-1865

 
 
A Veteran’s Life in Montgomery County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 10, 2018
1. A Veteran’s Life in Montgomery County Marker
Inscription.  In 1890, One of the 252 Civil War veterans still living in Montgomery County was Elias Price. The Department of Census interviewed Price and other Civil War veterans living in the county, recording critical details including which side of the war they served on, their company, and rank, there date of enlistment/discharge, and the severity of any wounds suffered. As a result of injuries sustained in the 1863 Battle of Parkers Store in Virginia, Price's right leg was amputated above the knee. (See Census list and medical record.)

Overall, 8-half million Civil War veterans were disabled as a result of injuries inflicted during combat. Many suffered wounds inflicted by the lead minie ball, which led to bone infections, blood poisoning, and amputations due to gangrene. Survival depended largely on which part of the body required surgery. The road to recovery often included the use of prosthetics, usually made of wood, metal and leather. These artificial limbs were paid for by both the federal and state governments.

Price did not let the loss of a leg hinder his future, nor did he forget his past. While employed as a shoemaker
A Veteran’s Life in Montgomery County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 10, 2018
2. A Veteran’s Life in Montgomery County Marker
and serving as mayor of Poolesville, Price was an active member of the Ridgley Brown Camp of Confederate Veterans of Montgomery County. He proudly recalled his time served in the 35th Battalion of Virginia Cavalry, in Company 8, better known as "Chiswell's Maryland Exiles," led by Col. Elijah Veirs White formerly of Poolesville. At the age 64, Price passed away in 1904, and was buried at Monocacy Cemetery in Beallsville.

George W. Cubitt, a Union Soldier, was considered to be the oldest Civil War veteran living in Montgomery County when he died on September 28, 1937. At age 95, Cubitt’s death was ‘superinduced by overexertion in cutting corn on his farm near Poolesville.’
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 39° 4.768′ N, 77° 20.412′ W. Marker is in Seneca, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Old River Road. This marker is near Seneca Creek at Poole's Store. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 16315 Old River Road, Poolesville MD 20837, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Seneca Mills During the Civil War (here, next to this marker); Seneca Store (within shouting distance of this marker); Seneca Mill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also
Elias Price image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 10, 2018
3. Elias Price
shown here seated on the back step of his Poolesville General Store, ca. 1900.
Close-up of photo on marker
Courtesy: Sandra Harber
named Seneca Store (within shouting distance of this marker); Seneca (within shouting distance of this marker); The Historic Seneca Schoolhouse (approx. 0.6 miles away); Seneca Schoolhouse (approx. 0.6 miles away); Rowser’s Ford (approx. ¾ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Seneca.
 
1890 Census lists Civil War veteran — Elias Price image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 10, 2018
4. 1890 Census lists Civil War veteran — Elias Price
Close-up of image on marker
Elias Price's Medical Record image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 10, 2018
5. Elias Price's Medical Record
Close-up of image on marker
Courtesy: Sandra Harber
Injured Zouave image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
6. Injured Zouave
Stereograph image of an injured soldier attended by fellow Zouave troops in a Union field hospital, c. 1861-1865.
Louis Martin image. Click for full size.
7. Louis Martin
Injured at the battle of the Crater, Louis Martin of the 29th U.S. Colored Infantry lost both his right arm and left leg. Such an injury necessitated the use of an artificial limb much like the one seen below.
Close-up of photo on marker
Artificial Limb image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy: Museum of Civil War Medicine
8. Artificial Limb
Close-up of photo on marker
<i>Teaching the Negro Recruits the Use of the Minie Rifle</i><br><u>Harper's Weekly</u>, Mar 14 1863 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
9. Teaching the Negro Recruits the Use of the Minie Rifle
Harper's Weekly, Mar 14 1863
The lead minie ball changed the face of combat. This bullet made loading rifles quicker and firing more accurate. It was the most common firearm used during the war and nearly every soldier received training using the weapon.
Grand Army of Republic Membership Medal image. Click for full size.
10. Grand Army of Republic Membership Medal
awarded to Union veterans.
Close-up of photo on marker
Washington, District of Columbia. The Grand Review of the Army. image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
11. Washington, District of Columbia. The Grand Review of the Army.
Gen. Francis P. Blair, staff and infantry of 17th Corps passing on Pennsylvania Avenue near the Treasury. (Army of Tenn.)

Fraternal organizations such as the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) were formed to serve as advocates for veteran affairs. General Frank Blair, whose family lived in Silver Spring, is shown leading the 17th Corps in a GAR parade along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. in May 1865.
Elias Price<br>1840 — 1904 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 13, 2018
12. Elias Price
1840 — 1904
The graves of Elias Price and Frances Price (Feb. 15 1844 — Dec. 21, 1936) in Monocacy Cemetery in Beallsville. Deo Vindici.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 18, 2018. It was originally submitted on June 13, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 180 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 13, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9. submitted on June 14, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   10, 11, 12. submitted on June 15, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Aug. 13, 2020