Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Petersburg in Dinwiddie County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

History of the Banks House

The Banks House

 

— Pamplin Historical Park —

 
History of the Banks House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2008
1. History of the Banks House Marker
Inscription.  This upper middle-class dwelling is one of the earliest surviving structures in Dinwiddie County. Unfortunately, the name of original builder has been lost to time. The architectural evidence suggests that the house evolved in four phases between 1750 and 1815 reflecting increases in family size and fortune.

Robert Lanier, who had purchased the house and 331 acres of land by 1815, is the earliest identified owner. Lanier raised tobacco on this property with the aid of ten slaves. Thomas Banks, a Scottish immigrant, acquired the property in 1839. Banks called his farm “Wakefield” after the popular novel The Vicar of Wakefield. Unlike Lanier, Banks focused on market farming to meet the growing demand for fresh produce in Petersburg. Subsequent owners grew such crops here through the 1940s. Pamplin Historical Park has restored the exterior of the house to its 1865 appearance and adaptively reused most of the interior as an employee residence. The large first-floor parlor has been furnished to represent Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant’s headquarters on April 2, 1865.
 
Erected by
Markers at the Banks House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2008
2. Markers at the Banks House
Several markers are found in Pamplin Historical Park near the Banks House. The "History of the Banks House" marker is to the extreme right.
Click or scan to see
this page online
Pamplin Historical Park.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1989.
 
Location. 37° 11.539′ N, 77° 27.95′ W. Marker is near Petersburg, Virginia, in Dinwiddie County. Marker can be reached from Hofheimer Way, on the left when traveling south. Marker is in Pamplin Historical Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Petersburg VA 23803, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Civil War Years (a few steps from this marker); After the Breakthrough: April 2, 1865 (a few steps from this marker); The Kitchen Quarter (within shouting distance of this marker); The Banks House (within shouting distance of this marker); A.P. Hill Memorial (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Confederate Counterattack (approx. 0.6 miles away); Where Hill Fell (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Breakthrough (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Petersburg.
 
More about this marker. The marker contains sketches showing the evolution of the appearance of the house: Included are the Front Elevation and First Floor Plan from Circa 1750, 1770, 1796 and 1815.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Markers in the Banks House section of Pamplin Historical Park.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Banks House. Pamplin Historical Park. (Submitted on October 1, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.) 

2. The Petersburg Campaign, 1864-5.
The Banks House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2008
3. The Banks House
The marker is located in front of this house, which served as headquarters for General-in-Chief Ulysses S. Grant after the breakthrough of the Confederate line on April 2, 1865.
(Submitted on October 1, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.)
 
Pamplin Historical Park image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2008
4. Pamplin Historical Park
The "History of the Banks House" Marker is located in Pamplin Historical Park near the Banks House.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 6, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 1, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 989 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 1, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.

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May. 23, 2022