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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Harrisburg in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Brigadier General Joseph F. Knipe House

 
 
Brigadier General Joseph F. Knipe House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 20, 2018
1. Brigadier General Joseph F. Knipe House Marker
Inscription.  In the home at 329 S. Front Street between 1866 and 1880 resided Brigadier General Joseph Farmer Knipe (1823-1901), accomplished Union commander during the Civil War. It was Knipe who named Camp Curtin, the largest Civil War troop deployment camp in the United States located in what is now a part of Uptown Harrisburg, after the wartime Governor Andrew Curtin. Knipe first served in the Mexican War (1846-1848). In response to Lincoln's call to arms after the fall of Fort Sumter in 1861, Knipe was commissioned Colonel of the 46th Pennsylvania Volunteers, which was organized in Harrisburg. He was promoted to Brigadier General in 1862 and served in the Antietam, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg Campaigns. During Antietam, he was wounded at Cedar Mountain. He was involved in the defense of Harrisburg when General Robert E. Lee threatened its invasion in June of 1863, and later commanded a cavalry division at the Battle of Nashville, Tennessee, during which his troops scored a decisive victory over Confederate General John B. Hood including the capture of over 6,000 men and eight battle flags. In the Atlanta Campaign, he was wounded at the Battle of
Marker detail: Brigadier General Joseph Farmer Knipe during the Civil War image. Click for full size.
Robert and Eileen Young Collection
2. Marker detail: Brigadier General Joseph Farmer Knipe during the Civil War
Resaca, Georgia. After being discharged from the Army in 1866, Knipe served as both the Postmaster of Harrisburg and of the United States Senate, and later as the superintendent of the military prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Knipe died in Harrisburg and is interred at Harrisburg Cemetery. This, his former home, was built between 1856 and 1858, and has been sensitively restored as a fitting tribute to yet another chapter of Harrisburg's illustrious history.
 
Erected by The Harrisburg History Project, Commissioned by Mayor Stephen R. Reed.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Pennsylvania, The Harrisburg History Project marker series.
 
Location. 40° 15.334′ N, 76° 52.65′ W. Marker is in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in Dauphin County. Marker is at the intersection of South Front Street and Vine Street, on the left when traveling north on South Front Street. Marker is located directly across the street from the Knipe house. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 329 S Front St, Harrisburg PA 17104, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Harris' Ferry (within shouting distance of this marker); John Harris Sr. Grave Site (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); John Harris / Simon Cameron Mansion (about 500 feet away);
Brigadier General Joseph F. Knipe House Marker (<i>tall view; house in background across street</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 20, 2018
3. Brigadier General Joseph F. Knipe House Marker (tall view; house in background across street)
Harrisburg's Grand Review of Black Troops (about 500 feet away); John Harris Mansion (about 500 feet away); John Harris, Sr., and the Mulberry Tree (about 500 feet away); Native Nations of the Susquehanna Valley (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Native Nations of the Susquehanna Valley (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Harrisburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Shipoke Neighborhood Walking Tour. The Federal brick house at 329 South Front Street was the home of General Joseph Knipe, a shoemaker and boot maker who was charged with the defense of Harrisburg when the Confederate troops were approaching during the Civil War. He organized a volunteer cavalry unit and also named the uptown military establishment Camp Curtin in honor of the then Governor even though he had been ordered by his superiors in Washington to name it Camp Union. After the war he served as postmaster of Harrisburg from 1866-74. Dated 1835, the Knipe house is one of the earliest standing buildings in the Shipoke neighborhood. (Submitted on August 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Joseph F. Knipe.
Brigadier General Joseph F. Knipe House Marker (<i>wide view; Knipe house is on the left</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 20, 2018
4. Brigadier General Joseph F. Knipe House Marker (wide view; Knipe house is on the left)
Following the war, Knipe returned to Harrisburg, where he was appointed postmaster by President Andrew Johnson. He subsequently held a number of political patronage positions the rest of his life, both on the Federal and state level. For a term, he was postmaster of the United States House of Representatives. (Submitted on August 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Gettysburg Campaign. As the Confederates approached, Carlisle was largely undefended. Shortly after Jenkins' first invasion and occupation of Chambersburg, on June 15-17, Pennsylvania Railroad officials had gathered supplies to rebuild a railroad bridge that the southerners had destroyed near Scotland, north of Chambersburg. To protect them, General Darius N. Couch, the Union commander at Harrisburg, detailed two New York militia regiments-the 8th and 71st-to move by rail as far as Scotland. In command of these men was Brigadier General Joseph F. Knipe, who was home, still recovering from a wound he had received at the battle of Chancellorsville in May. (Submitted on August 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. he Role of the New York State Militia in the Civil War. On 18 June the 8th and 71st Regiments (1st Brigade) under Colonel Joshua Varian moved from Harrisburg to Shippensburg. Brigadier General
Brigadier General Joseph F. Knipe House (<i>historical plaque mounted between front windows</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 20, 2018
5. Brigadier General Joseph F. Knipe House (historical plaque mounted between front windows)
General Joseph F. Knipe
Leader in the defense of
Harrisburg when the Confederates
were approaching the city
June 29, 1863
Lived in this house
Placed by the
Harris Park Civic Association
October 1954
Joseph Knipe, a regular army officer and resident of Harrisburg, was at home recuperating from malaria. He offered his services, and on 20 June Couch directed him to assume command of Varian's brigade. Knipe received an almost impossible mission: use two small regiments of citizen-soldiers that he had never seen before, to delay the advance of an entire army corps of combat veterans. (Submitted on August 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ArchitectureWar, US Civil
 
General Joseph F. Knipe House (<i>wide view; Knipe house is on the left</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 20, 2018
6. General Joseph F. Knipe House (wide view; Knipe house is on the left)
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on August 21, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 93 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 20, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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