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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Aurora in Portage County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Geauga Lake

 
 
Geauga Lake Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 18, 2018
1. Geauga Lake Marker
Side A
Inscription.  Side A
Geauga Lake, a scenic destination for visitors to northeast Ohio, was initially named “Giles Pond” after settler Sullivan Giles (1809-1880). In 1856, the predecessor of the Erie Railroad stopped at “Pond Station,” spurring the area’s growth. In the 1880s, locals established picnic grounds, a dance hall, and other facilities for those seeking a country getaway. Picnic Lake Park, later Geauga Lake Park, opened in 1887 and thereafter offered rides, a roller rink, photo gallery, billiard hall and bowling alley, among other attractions. In 1888, the Kent House hotel opened on the southeast side of the lake. In the century that followed, more attractions were added, including SeaWorld of Ohio, and the park expanded. In 2007, the melodic sounds of the carousel and the echoing screams from the “Big Dipper” roller coaster ceased when the park closed. (Continued on other side)

Side B
(Continued from other side) Geauga Lake began as a cluster of summer cottages occupied by vacationers to Giles Pond. Residential growth began in earnest with the formation of two allotment companies:
Geauga Lake Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 18, 2018
2. Geauga Lake Marker
Side B
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the Geauga Lake Orchard Company (1915) and the Western Reserve Land Company (1920). In 1921, the Geauga Lake Improvement Association (GLIA) was chartered to protect the residents’ access to the lake. During Prohibition, this rural setting was the site of speakeasies and dancehalls such as the Magnolia Club. Because of gas rationing during World War II, the GLIA’s lakeside clubhouse doubled as a church, with services offered by Reverend J.R. Hutcherson (1905-1996). The postwar era housing shortage and improvements in transportation brought a transition to the community with year-round housing. As of 2017, the GLIA continues to be the guardian of the adjacent area.
 
Erected 2017 by City of Aurora Landmark Commission and the Ohio History Connection. (Marker Number 16-67.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: EntertainmentWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1856.
 
Location. 41° 20.798′ N, 81° 22.619′ W. Marker is in Aurora, Ohio, in Portage County. Marker is on North Aurora Road (Ohio Route 43) 0.1 miles north of East Boulevard, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Aurora OH 44202, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this
Geauga Lake Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 18, 2018
3. Geauga Lake Marker
Side A
marker, measured as the crow flies. The Chillicothe Turnpike (approx. 2.6 miles away); The Church In Aurora (approx. 2.8 miles away); Ebenezer Sheldon (approx. 2.9 miles away); In Memory of Those (approx. 2.9 miles away); Carlton & Flora Lowe (approx. 3.2 miles away); Bainbridge School (approx. 3.2 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. 3.2 miles away); Silver Creek Cheese Factory (approx. 3.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Aurora.
 
Also see . . .  Geauga Lake: Today and Forever. (Submitted on August 19, 2018, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
 
Geauga Lake Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 18, 2018
4. Geauga Lake Marker
Side B
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 19, 2018. It was originally submitted on August 19, 2018, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 226 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 19, 2018, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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May. 18, 2021