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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

Ex-Palace of the Inquisition

 
 
Ex-Palace of the Inquisition Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, August 18, 2018
1. Ex-Palace of the Inquisition Marker
Inscription.  
Antiguo Palacio de la Inquisición
Este edificio se construyó de diciembre de 1732 a diciembre de 1736, por el Arq. Pedro de Arrieta. Declarado monumento.
Dirección de Monumentos Coloniales. 1963

English translation:
Ex-Palace of the Inquisition
This building was constructed from December 1732 to December 1736 by the Architect Pedro de Arrieta. It was declared as an official monument.
Office of Colonial Monuments. 1963
 
Erected 1963 by Dirección de Monumentos Coloniales.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionColonial EraMan-Made Features.
 
Location. 19° 26.264′ N, 99° 8.003′ W. Marker is in Ciudad de Mexico. Marker is on Calle República de Venezuela just west of Calle República de Argentina, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Calle República de Venezuela 6, Ciudad de Mexico 06000, Mexico. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Manuel Acuña (here, next to this marker); House of the Adelantados of New Galicia
Ex-Palace of the Inquisition and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, August 18, 2018
2. Ex-Palace of the Inquisition and Marker
The marker can be seen on the right in this view of the Palacio de la Escuela de Medicina (Palace of the Medical School), on the left heading east on Calle República de Venezuela. It is below a larger marker dedicated to Manuel Acuña.
(a few steps from this marker); Gónzalo de Salazar (within shouting distance of this marker); Ex-Customs House (within shouting distance of this marker); Servando Teresa de Mier (within shouting distance of this marker); Plaza and Portal of Santo Domingo (within shouting distance of this marker); Temple of Santo Domingo (within shouting distance of this marker); Jail of the Inquisition (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ciudad de Mexico.
 
Regarding Ex-Palace of the Inquisition. The project of building the Ex-Palace of the Inquisition was entrusted to the architect Pedro de Arrieta, Master of the Material Works of the Holy Office. The location of the building, north of the Plaza de Santo Domingo, between the temple of the same name and the Royal Customs House, is essential to understand the social, political, economic and religious importance that the palace had in the capital of New Spain. Construction began in 1732 and was completed in 1736. During those four years, Arrieta received a daily wage of two pesos. The building was the seat of the Tribunal of
Ex-Palace of the Inquisition image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, August 18, 2018
3. Ex-Palace of the Inquisition
This view is of the western face of the Ex-Palace of the Inquisition. The marker is around the corner of the building,not visible here.
the Holy Office for 84 years, until the court was definitively closed in 1820. After several years of abandonment and disuse, in 1838, the Palace was auctioned publicly, but nobody bought it; the legends and myths that surrounded the Inquisition scared off potential buyers. Subsequently, the building was the temporary headquarters of the Archbishopric of the City, of the National Lottery, a primary school and even later a military barracks. Finally in 1854 it became the School of Medicine.

For almost a hundred years, lessons of medicine and nursing were given in the Palace, including a boarding school for the students. The chapel became the Academy of Medicine, where the graduated doctors took the Hippocratic Oath. In 1956, the School of Medicine moved to the University City of the UNAM and great restoration work began on the Palace to recover the damage that the years of intense use had caused. The restoration was completed in 1980 and on December 22 of that same year the Museum of Mexican Medicine was inaugurated. Translated and adapted from the Museum's site at http://pem.facmed.unam.mx
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 22, 2018. It was originally submitted on August 22, 2018, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 45 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 22, 2018, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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