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Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Temples of Mercy

American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site

 
 
Temples of Mercy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
1. Temples of Mercy Marker
Inscription.  The churches of Gettysburg were the first to offer their facilities to serve the needs of wounded soldiers borne from the battlefield on July 1st. Public buildings and many private homes followed the lead in showing care and mercy.

As soon as the churches opened their doors, ambulances arrived with their fightful cargo. The work to restore the mutilated bodies began, continuing around the clock. Postoperative care and food preparation fell mainly to the tireless efforts of women volunteers.

It was a scene of immense suffering! Agnes Barr, a member helping at the Presbyterian Church, recalled, "the shrieks and groans of the wounded were heart rending."

Churches continued to be used as hospitals after the armies departed, causing parishioners to forego normal services, prompting Sallie Broadhead to note in her diary, "we have had no Sundays...the churches have all been converted into hospitals."
 
Erected by Main Street Gettysburg. (Marker Number 94.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil
Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
2. Presbyterian Church
The marker is on the right near the church message board.
Click or scan to see
this page online
. In addition, it is included in the American Presbyterian and Reformed Historic Sites ⛪, and the Former U.S. Presidents: #34 Dwight D. Eisenhower series lists. A significant historical month for this entry is July 1888.
 
Location. 39° 49.701′ N, 77° 13.859′ W. Marker is in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is at the intersection of Baltimore Street (Business U.S. 15) and East High Street, on the right when traveling north on Baltimore Street. Located in front of the Gettysburg Presbyterian Church. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 208 Baltimore Street, Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Field Hospitals - Cavalry Corps (a few steps from this marker); Presidents Attended Service Here (a few steps from this marker); The Memorial Church of the Prince of Peace (a few steps from this marker); Gettysburg Address Memorial and Abraham Lincoln Statue (within shouting distance of this marker); "uncertainty and dread" (within shouting distance of this marker); 223 Baltimore Street (within shouting distance of this marker); “ . . . I Am Going To Die” (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); John L. Burns (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker. On the right side of the marker is a photo of the church as it appeared around 1880. (Caption is rather worn and hard to read.)
 
Regarding Temples of Mercy.
American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
3. American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site
The church is listed by the Presbyterian Historical Society as historical site number 94.
Gettysburg Presbyterian Church is one of 445 American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Sites registered between 1973 and 2003 by the Presbyterian Historical Society (PHS), headquartered in Philadelphia. Approved sites received a metal plaque featuring John Calvin’s seal and the site’s registry number (PHS marker location in front of church building).

The following text is taken from the Presbyterian Historical Society website:

The Presbytery of Donegal recorded a church at Marsh Creek as early as 1740. The congregation of the Upper Presbyterian Church of Marsh Creek was incorporated on September 13, 1787. The congregation voted to move the church to the nearby town of Gettysburg in 1813. In 1842, the first building on the present site was erected. In 1968, the entire structure had to be replaced, but the design is similar to the original. The name of the church was changed to Presbyterian Church of Gettysburg in 1868. Abraham Lincoln worshipped in the church after dedicating the National Cemetery on November 19, 1863, and Dwight D. Eisenhower became a member of the congregation after leaving office in 1961.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 3, 2020. It was originally submitted on May 22, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 810 times since then and 24 times this year. Last updated on August 24, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 22, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

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Sep. 23, 2021