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Lebanon Junction in Bullitt County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Lebanon Junction

Christmas Raid

ó December 29-30, 1862 ó

 
 
Lebanon Junction Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Bosse, July 5, 2018
1. Lebanon Junction Marker
Inscription.  The American Civil War was the first conflict to utilize railroads for the movement of troops and supplies. Consequently, protecting the railroads was an important aspect of military strategy on both sides. In Kentucky this task fell to the Union army. The L&N Railroad was the main north-south supply line for Federal soldiers in Nashville and beyond. In Kentucky the L&N crossed numerous streams bridged with wooden trestles. Confederate cavalry exploited these weak points on the line.

In December 1862 Morganís cavalry undertook its most successful Kentucky raid. The northern advance of this raid ended near Lebanon Junction. On December 28, Morgan burned the two trestles on Muldraugh Hill. That same day he sent a detachment of men under Maj. Robert S. Bullock to burn the trestles at the Rolling Fork, Cain Run and Belmont.

With his mission accomplished, Morgan had to get his command across the Rolling Fork and back to Tennessee. Less than three miles south of Lebanon Junction, Union Col. John Marshall Harlanís infantry, with a battery of artillery, finally caught the Confederates. Here, Harlan attacked Morganís rear guard,
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wounding Col. Basil Duke. Despite Harlanís action the Confederates managed to cross the Rolling Fork. They moved south and burned the trestle at Boston before heading on to Lebanon.

In the end, Morganís soldiers spared Lebanon Junction the fate suffered by many of the Kentucky towns they passed through. The town was not plundered nor robbed, although it was cut off from vital rail traffic as Morganís soldiers had burned the trestles at Cain Run and Boston and had ripped up miles of track. It was March 1863 before service on the L&N was fully restored.

(captions)
Location of Stockades

Morgan's men burned bridges and ripped up track, putting the L&N out of service for over three months.

Morgan's men destroyed the trestles at Cain Run, Belmont, and Boston.

Col. Basil Duke, Morgan's second in command, was wounded in the fighting at the Rolling Fork River.
 
Erected by Kentucky Heartland Civil War Trails Commission. (Marker Number 14.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail in Kentucky series list. A significant historical date for this entry is December 29, 1862.
 
Location. 37° 50.065′ N, 85° 43.976′ W. Marker is in Lebanon Junction
Lebanon Junction Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Bosse, July 5, 2018
2. Lebanon Junction Marker
, Kentucky, in Bullitt County. Marker is on Main Street (Kentucky Route 434) west of South Poplar Street, on the left when traveling west. Marker located in front of the Lebanon Junction Fire Department. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 291 Main Street, Lebanon Junction KY 40150, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sherman Here (here, next to this marker); Belmont Furnace / Iron Made in Kentucky (approx. 4.4 miles away); Morgan's Second Raid (approx. 4.6 miles away); Stockade at Belmont (approx. 4.7 miles away); Salt River Furnace / Iron Made in Kentucky (approx. 6.7 miles away); Skirmish at Rolling Fork (approx. 7.2 miles away); Action at Bardstown Junction (approx. 7Ĺ miles away); Booker Noe (approx. 7.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lebanon Junction.
 
Gen. John Hunt Morgan, C.S.A. image. Click for full size.
3. Gen. John Hunt Morgan, C.S.A.
Col. John Marshall Harlan, U.S.A. image. Click for full size.
4. Col. John Marshall Harlan, U.S.A.
Col. Basil W. Duke, C.S.A. image. Click for full size.
5. Col. Basil W. Duke, C.S.A.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 6, 2018. It was originally submitted on August 18, 2018, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 422 times since then and 26 times this year. Last updated on September 4, 2018, by T. Patton of Jefferson, Georgia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 18, 2018, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.   3, 4. submitted on August 18, 2018.   5. submitted on August 18, 2018, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 13, 2024