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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Houston in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

David Finney Stuart, M.D.

(August 15, 1833 - September 8, 1909)

 
 
David Finney Stuart, M.D. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, September 3, 2018
1. David Finney Stuart, M.D. Marker
Inscription.  David Finney Stuart was born in Brooke County, Western Virginia, to William and Mary Cummins Stuart. Upon the death of his parents, Stuart moved to Texas to live with his sister Elizabeth, wife of the Rev. Dr. James Weston Miller. A brother-in-law, Dr. George Clark Red, encouraged Stuart to become a physician, and after completing his medical studies in Philadelphia and New Orleans, Dr. Stuart began his practice with Dr. Red in Washington County, Texas in 1860.

During the Civil War Stuart served the Confederacy as a surgeon in the 10th Texas Infantry. He moved to Houston in 1866, then had yellow fever during the great epidemic of 1867. Years later, he became an authority on the treatment of the disease. He was instrumental in the reorganization of the Texas State Medical Association in 1869, serving as its fourth president in 1873. Also that year, he and Dr. Ashbel Smith were founders of the newly-chartered medical school in Galveston, then known as Texas Medical College. Stuart served as the school's president from 1878 until it was followed by the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston in 1891.

Dr. Stuart, together
David Finney Stuart, M.D. Gravesite image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, September 3, 2018
2. David Finney Stuart, M.D. Gravesite
with Drs. Joshua Larendon and Thomas J. Boyles, opened the Houston Infirmary in the early 1870s. Dr. Stuart was Chief Surgeon for several railroads. As chairman of the Houston Board of Health he cared for the indigent, and he also served on many bank and corporate boards. Dr. Stuart was celebrated for his dedication to improving the lives of the citizens of his adopted city and state and was known during his lifetime as a leading physician in Texas.
 
Erected 2009 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 15726.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Science & Medicine.
 
Location. 29° 45.915′ N, 95° 23.113′ W. Marker is in Houston, Texas, in Harris County. Marker can be reached from Washington Avenue. David Stuart is buried in Glenwood Cemetery, Section F-1, Lot 012. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2525 Washington Avenue, Houston TX 77007, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. James S. and Alfred T. Lucas (a few steps from this marker); The Rev. William M. Tryon (within shouting distance of this marker); Anson Jones (within shouting distance of this marker); Colonel B.F. Terry (within shouting distance of this marker); Belle Sherman Kendall (about 300 feet
David Finney Stuart, M.D. Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, September 3, 2018
3. David Finney Stuart, M.D. Grave Marker
away, measured in a direct line); Irvin Capers Lord (about 300 feet away); Darius Gregg (about 500 feet away); Archibald Wynns (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Houston.
 
Also see . . .  Stuart, David Finney - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on September 5, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Atascocita, Texas.) 
 
David Finney Stuart, M.D. Burial Site image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, January 5, 2020
4. David Finney Stuart, M.D. Burial Site
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 11, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 5, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Atascocita, Texas. This page has been viewed 181 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 5, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Atascocita, Texas.   4. submitted on January 8, 2020, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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Sep. 27, 2020