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Victor in Ontario County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

New York Central Station at Main Street Fishers

 
 
New York Central Station at Main Street Fishers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, October 26, 2018
1. New York Central Station at Main Street Fishers Marker
Inscription.  
New York Central Station at Main Street Fishers

The railroad brought the sort of deal making which accompanies such major developments. Charles Fisher landed a contract for cutting ties and lumber for the railroad, and later wood for the wood-burning locomotives, at his strategically-located sawmill in Fishers. He expected a station to be located near his saw mill. However, Charles Talmadge ran a competing sawmill along the route a mile east, near his home close to what would become the Phillips Road crossing. Talmadge believed the station should be located there, instead, and signed up supporters from as afar away as Mendon. Railroad officials advised Fisher, who got up a petition of his own that if he would erect a station building at no expense to the railroad they would chose his site. He did and they did.

The 1870s began four decades which were to be the golden years of Victor agriculture. Farmers raised animals, fruit, vegetables, grain crops, and especially, potatoes. A number of brokers built warehouses at railroad shipping points at Fishers and Victor, from where potatoes were shipped throughout the nation
New York Central Station at Main Street Fishers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, October 26, 2018
2. New York Central Station at Main Street Fishers Marker
Northward. Left marker.
and to some foreign countries. The new industry gave the biggest boost to the economy of Fishers, strategically located in the center of the best potato-growing land. The New York Central Railroad, which built a larger passenger station in Fishers in the 1870s, added a freight house along with three rail sidings to handle the increased business.
~Victor: The History of a Town.

[captions]
The New York Central crossing looking north at Fishers' Main Street, circa 1911. The passenger depot is at the left, the pumphouse is just off the photo at the near right and the millpond and grist/sawmill are off the photo at the far right

Passenger tickets from the final run on the Auburn Railroad from Rochester to Syracuse on May 18, 1958.

Tariff Schedule for Auburn & Rochester Railroad, circa 1844.

Newspaper article in the May 18, 1958 Rochester Democrat and Chronicle.

The Railroad Opened Markets for Agricultural Products

Potatoes were an especially important crop for Victor farmers. The sandy soils of Baker and Turk hills in the northern part of the town, and the Hopper Hills area in the southwest did not grow the type of potatoes best for eating. But, the soil was exceptionally fertile for raising seed potatoes to be planted in different soils elsewhere. Most importantly, in a time of poor refrigeration, Victor potatoes did not
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spoil easily. A number of brokers built warehouses at railroad shipping points at Fishers and Victor, from where potatoes were shipped throughout the nation and to some foreign countries as well.

Like a driver stopping to show his new car to his friends, New York Central and Hudson River Railroad engineer Alexander McCrahon of Fishers leaned from engine 19's cab in the 1860s to be photographed at the Fishers depot with some neighbors. Also identified are the two men with their outstretched arms resting on the cowcatcher, conductor Sylvester Murphy, left, and the station agent Charles Fisher.

Engine 19, "The Pride of the Auburn Railroad," was one of a series of locomotives being built ay the William Mason Machine Works in Taunton, Mass. in 1856. Its designer sought beauty, classical lines and aesthetic balance to locomotive design. The logo of the Auburn Trail was inspired by this photograph.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureRailroads & Streetcars.
 
Location. 43° 0.52′ N, 77° 28.034′ W. Marker is in Victor, New York, in Ontario County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Main Street Fishers and Mill Street. Marker is by the Auburn Trail behind the Post Office. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7847 Main Street Fishers, Victor NY 14564, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
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are within walking distance of this marker. Cobblestone Pumphouse at Fishers Station (here, next to this marker); Auburn Trail Location Map (here, next to this marker); Fishers (a few steps from this marker); Pumphouse (a few steps from this marker); Fisher Homestead (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pabos (approx. 0.2 miles away); Camp Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); Home of Sgt. Amos Woodin (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Victor.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 28, 2018. It was originally submitted on October 28, 2018, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. This page has been viewed 70 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 28, 2018, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.
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Feb. 24, 2021