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Ticonderoga in Essex County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Garrison Garden

 
 
Garrison Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2018
1. Garrison Garden Marker
Inscription.  
Eighteenth century soldiers lived largely on portable food. On the march, their diet consisted of flour, rice, dried peas and beans, salted or pickled meat – goods that could travel in bags or barrels without spoiling. In Europe, soldiers depended on foraging in the countryside to supplement their rations. But the wilds of the New World offered no farmers’ garden to loot. Consequently, most wilderness forts had huge gardens, planted by the small winter garrison to provide fresh vegetables for the thousands of troops arriving for the summer campaign season.

The French soldiers who built Fort Carillon filled the space between today’s tree lines with a garden they called le jardin du Roi or “the King’s Garden.” They laid out neat geometrical beds planted with leafy greens, root vegetables, flavorful herbs and lots of cabbage. Soldiers could earn extra pay by tending garden. When General Amherst’s British forces captured Fort Carillon, one of his sergeants gained favor by delivering several heads of cabbage stolen from the garden.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and Castles
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War, French and Indian.
 
Location. 43° 50.54′ N, 73° 23.073′ W. Marker is in Ticonderoga, New York, in Essex County. Marker is at the King's Garden on the grounds of Fort Ticonderoga. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ticonderoga NY 12883, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Breaking Ground (within shouting distance of this marker); Lord & Burnham Estate Greenhouse (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Breaking Ground (within shouting distance of this marker); A Layered Legacy (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Historic English Gate (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named A Layered Legacy (about 500 feet away); French Bake Ovens, 1757 (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named French Bake Ovens, 1757 (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ticonderoga.
 
More about this marker. Detail from A Plan of the Town and Fort of Carillon at Ticonderoga, by Thomas Jefferys, 1768 appears on the left side of the marker. It has a caption of “A map of the action at Carillon in 1758 shows the extent of the garden here on the flats below the Fort, filling the entire open space around you. The small
Garrison Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2018
2. Garrison Garden Marker
shaded rectangles may indicate storage sheds or other outbuildings.”
An image of a letter in the upper right of the marker includes a caption of “New World plants and animals inspired the scientific interest of many educated 18th century gentlemen. Lord Loudoun, Commander in Chief of British forces in North America during the Seven Years War, sent this letter to William Johnson requesting seeds and plant specimens for his personal collection at home in Scotland.”
Next to a picture of a hoe is the caption “The shape of gardening tools has remained virtually unchanged over the years. However, 18th century forged iron implements weighed considerably more than their modern steel counterparts.”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 14, 2018. It was originally submitted on November 14, 2018, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 164 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 14, 2018, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.

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Apr. 24, 2024