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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

"A Great Time to be Alive"

 
 
"A Great Time to be Alive" Marker image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, January 21, 2019
1. "A Great Time to be Alive" Marker
Inscription.  'On October 22, 1959, The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., pastor, civil rights leader and president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) made his only visit to Fort Worth, Texas. Dr. Vada Phillips Felder, local educator, activist, and friend of Dr. King’s had invited him to Fort Worth when they both attended a church conference in Nashville. Upon his arrival, Dr. King was greeted by African American community leaders. He also experienced some anger, hate and bomb threats. He stayed upstairs in Vada Felder’s home on Stewart Street, and attended a reception at the Bellaire Drive West home of the Revs. Alberta and Harold Lunger, Professor of Social Ethics, Brite College of the Bible (now Brite Divinity School) at Texas Christian University. That evening four hundred people were in attendance when Dr. King spoke at the historic Majestic Theater at 1101 Commerce Street. On that occasion the theater was integrated when African Americans were, for the first time, allowed to enter through the front door and sit in the lower seats.

'In 1954 Vada Felder was the first African American to graduate from Brite College of the Bible

"A Great Time to be Alive" Marker area image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, January 21, 2019
2. "A Great Time to be Alive" Marker area
Taken from across Main Street, the marker is seen edge-on in the center of this photo.
with a Masters of Religious Education. She was a member of Mount Zion Baptist Church for over 50 years, authored Christian Education materials, founded and operated United Christian Leadership School, and taught in Fort Worth’s James Guinn Elementary School and at Bishop College. She said that Dr. King’s visit “…gave us courage. He taught us that we could stand up and do what was right – and do it in peace”.

'It was truly a great day to be alive in Fort Worth, Texas'

'Sponsored by Dr. Gary & Anne Lacefield'
'in memory of mother Carol Ann Tatum'

 
Erected 2019 by Fort Worth Heritage Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil RightsWomen. In addition, it is included in the Historically Black Colleges and Universities 🎓 series list.
 
Location. 32° 45.099′ N, 97° 19.752′ W. Marker is in Fort Worth, Texas, in Tarrant County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and W 9th Street, on the right when traveling south on Main Street. In General Worth Square, across Main St. from the JFK marker in the same series. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 915 Main Street, Fort Worth TX 76102, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker.

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JFK (a few steps from this marker); General William Jenkins Worth (within shouting distance of this marker); Cynthia Ann Parker and Native Americans of North Texas (within shouting distance of this marker); Flatiron Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Worth Library (about 400 feet away); The Atelier Building (about 500 feet away); Flying Machines (about 500 feet away); The Wild Bunch (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Worth.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Worth Commemorates MLK Visit with Marker (NBCDFW.com). (Submitted on January 26, 2019, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 26, 2019. It was originally submitted on January 26, 2019, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. This page has been viewed 413 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 26, 2019, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 4, 2021