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Williamsport in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Wagoner's Fight - July 6, 1863

 
 
The Wagoner's Fight - July 6, 1863 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), April 6, 2019
1. The Wagoner's Fight - July 6, 1863 Marker
Inscription.  Following the Battle of Gettysburg, the retreating Confederate troops and ambulance train occupied Williamsport, trapped by the impassible Potomac. Expecting an attack, Brigadier General John D. Imboden set up defensive positions along the crest of a ridge about one-half mile from Williamsport.

Late in the afternoon of July 6, 1863, Union cavalry under the command of Brigadier General John Buford arrived east of Williamsport, flanking the town. To bolster the number of Confederate troops and wounded that were fighting, Imboden asked his wagoners (wagon drivers) to join the fight and over 600 readily volunteered. Fighting continued into the evening, with Imboden fooling his enemy by advancing a line of infantry about 100 yards beyond the crest of the ridge and then slowly pulling the men back out of sight.

At sundown Union Brigadier General George A. Custer and his Michigan "Wolverines" arrived to fight but were quickly withdrawn by Brigadier General Judson Kilpatrick and retreated with Buford's men. This signaled the end of the fight.

Losses of Battle

Federal (includes horse artillery)
1st
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Cavalry Division, Brig. Gen. John Buford (Strength 3,983, 175 losses)
3rd Cavalry Division including one brigade of 2nd Cavalry Division, Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick (Strength 4,633, 75 losses)

Confederate
Cavalry Division includes horse artillery (Strength 5,607, 150 losses)
Mixed Defenses — artillery, infantry, teamsters etc. (Strength 1,900, 125 loses)

Courtesy of Authors J.D. Petruzzi, Steven Stanley and their book The Gettysburg Campaign in Numbers and Losses

 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is July 6, 1863.
 
Location. 39° 35.949′ N, 77° 48.863′ W. Marker is in Williamsport, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker can be reached from Springfield Lane south of Maplehurst Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 12 Springfield Lane, Williamsport MD 21795, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Springfield Farm (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Boy Scout Troop 17, 100 Years Old (approx. 0.2 miles away); Williamsport (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Williamsport (approx. 0.2 miles away); Band Stand (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Springfield Farm
The Wagoner's Fight - July 6, 1863 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), April 6, 2019
2. The Wagoner's Fight - July 6, 1863 Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); The Wagon Train of the Wounded and Williamsport (approx. ¼ mile away); Confederate Hospitals in Williamsport (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Williamsport.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2019. It was originally submitted on April 6, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 409 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 6, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Apr. 21, 2024