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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Luray in Page County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Stony Man

 
 
Stony Man Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, October 4, 2008
1. Stony Man Marker
Inscription.  
Can you see a man's stony face in the rock outcrop on the high peak directly to your left? Someone thought they could, thus the peak's name, Stony Man. Stony Man is Shenandoah National Park's second highest peak at 4,011 feet.

To enjoy views from Stony Man's forehead, you can hike the Stony Man Nature Trail which begins 3.1 miles south of here at the Nature Trail Parking Area at Skyland's north entrance.

Stony Man's Cold Past
Stony Man reminds us of cold times. Ten thousand years ago when glaciers covered much of North America, this area was much colder. Cold climate plants covered the land. Then temperatures began to rise. Glaciers retreated northward and other plants, adapted to a warmer climate, took over. But in the coolness on top of Stony Man a few cold weather plants survived. Native red spruce and balsam fir persist there today, reminding us of Stony Man's cold past.
 
Erected by Shenandoah National Park.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Natural Features.
 
Location. Marker has been reported permanently removed.
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It was located near 38° 36.719′ N, 78° 21.767′ W. Marker was near Luray, Virginia, in Page County. Marker was on Skyline Drive, on the left when traveling south. Located at the Stony Man Overlook, near Hughes River Gap, in Shenandoah National Park. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Luray VA 22835, United States of America.

We have been informed that this sign or monument is no longer there and will not be replaced. This page is an archival view of what was.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. Old Man in the Mountain (here, next to this marker); Civilian Conservation Corps (approx. 1.3 miles away); Stony Man Trailhead (approx. 1˝ miles away); Prelude to a Park (approx. 1.6 miles away); If These Walls Could Talk (approx. 1.6 miles away); Shenandoah's Centerpiece (approx. 1.7 miles away); Construction of the Skyline Drive (approx. 2.1 miles away); Old Rag (approx. 2.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Luray.
 
More about this marker. In the upper center is a photo of the profile of Stony Man, directly to your left. Can you see a face? On the right is a photo showing Red spruce and balsam fir, both cold climate plants, survive on top of
Stony Man Overlook Walkway image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, October 4, 2008
2. Stony Man Overlook Walkway
Both the Visibility Endangered and Stony Man markers are seen on the right along the stone wall.
Stony Man as relicts, species that persist from a climate of the past.
At the bottom of the marker is a panorama of the view highlighting Massanutten Mountain, New Market Gap (13 miles), Shenandoah Valley, Luray, Lake Arrowhead, and North Mountain (26 miles).
 
Stony Man Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2011
3. Stony Man Marker
View of Stony Man from the Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, October 4, 2008
4. View of Stony Man from the Marker
Looking over the parking area toward Stony Man's peak.
View from Summit of Stony Man image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2011
5. View from Summit of Stony Man
The Stony Man Mountain Overlook, where the marker is located, can be seen in the center of this photo taken from the summit of Stony Man.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 15, 2023. It was originally submitted on November 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,395 times since then and 83 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on August 6, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.   4. submitted on November 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on August 6, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.

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Jun. 16, 2024