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Beaufort in Beaufort County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Beaufort National Cemetery

 
 
Beaufort National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 30, 2019
1. Beaufort National Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  
National Cemetery
Beaufort National Cemetery was established in 1863. The U.S. Army Quartermaster General's Office laid out the 22 acres in sections that radiate outward from a central plaza to form a half circle. Of the 9,226 interments here in 1874, about half were known. Many of the unknown dead were Union prisoners of war originally buried at Camp Lawton in Georgia.

New construction in the 1870s included a Second Empire-style lodge for the superintendent and a brick wall to enclose the cemetery. The existing Dutch Colonial Revival-style lodge was built in 1934. Although it has grown in size, the cemetery retains many of its original design features.

There are two Civil War monuments. The Union Soldiers Monument, a 20-foot-tall granite obelisk, was erected through the efforts of Mrs. Eliza McGuffin Potter in 1870. The second, a marble tablet on a raised brick base, lists the names of 175 soldiers who Mrs. Potter attended as a nurse in Beaufort hospitals.

Civil War Beaufort (left panel)
Soon after the Civil War began in April 1861, Confederate troops fortified the city of Beaufort. Fort
Marker detail: Cemetery entrance, 1904 image. Click for full size.
National Archives and Records Administration
2. Marker detail: Cemetery entrance, 1904
Cemetery entrance, 1904, showing the first permanent superintendent lodge, 1881 (right), which replaced the temporary wood lodge, c. 1867 (left). The older building was built across the street from the cemetery (foreground), and later moved inside the cemetery to be used as an outbuilding.
Walker on Hilton Head Island and Fort Beauregard on St. Phillips Island protected the approach to Port Royal Bay.

On the morning of November 7, 1861, a Union fleet of seventeen gunboats pounded the forts with artillery fire. By late afternoon, the Confederates had abandoned both islands.

The Union Navy gained control of one of the best harbors on the Atlantic coast. Its blockading fleet could resupply and repair in protected waters. Beaufort, upriver from the islands, was transformed into a naval station, hospital center, and Union Army headquarters.

U.S. Colored Troops (right panel)
Beginning in March 1863, the federal government began recruiting black men for the Union Army. A few months later, the War Department created the Bureau of United States Colored Troops (USCT). USCT regiments fought in battles and engagements from Virginia to Texas. There are more than 1,700 USCT soldiers buried here.

In the late 1980s, the remains of nineteen soldiers, determined by archaeologists to be members of the all-black 55th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, were discovered on Folly Island near Charleston. In 1989, the remains were reinterred with full military honors between Section 56 and the back wall of the cemetery.
 
Erected by by U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Cemetery Administration
Marker detail: Union Hospital No. 7 at Beaufort, c. 1865 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
3. Marker detail: Union Hospital No. 7 at Beaufort, c. 1865
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Marker series. This marker is included in the National Cemeteries marker series.
 
Location. 32° 26.398′ N, 80° 40.781′ W. Marker is in Beaufort, South Carolina, in Beaufort County. Marker can be reached from Boundary Street (Business U.S. 21) west of Bladen Street, on the right when traveling west. Marker is located just inside the main gate, beside the sidewalk on the west side of the cemetery office building. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1601 Boundary Street, Beaufort SC 29902, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A National Cemetery System (here, next to this marker); Address by President Lincoln (within shouting distance of this marker); 1st SC Infantry Of African Descent (within shouting distance of this marker); Re-interred 19 African-American Civil War Volunteers (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Beaufort (approx. 0.4 miles away); Grand Army of the Republic Hall (approx. 0.4 miles away); Beaufort Historic District (approx. half a mile away); St. Helena's Church (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Beaufort.
 
Regarding Beaufort National Cemetery. National Register of Historic Places #97001208 (1997)
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
Marker detail: Memorial Day 1989 image. Click for full size.
By National Cemetery Administration
4. Marker detail: Memorial Day 1989
USCT reenactor pauses at coffins that contain the remains of black soldiers discovered on Folly Island, South Carolina, prior to reburial on Memorial Day 1989.
Beaufort National Cemetery
 
Also see . . .  United States Colored Troops. United States Colored Troops (USCT) were the embodiment of Frederick Douglass’s belief that “he who would be free must himself strike the blow." Approximately 180,000 men -- many who had formerly been enslaved -- volunteered to fight in the Union army; nearly 40,000 gave their lives for the cause. With every engagement they fought in, African-Americans time and again proved their mettle. The USCT were a watershed in American history, and one of the first major strides toward equal civil rights. (Submitted on May 27, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil
 
Beaufort National Cemetery Marker<br>(<i>wide view • marker on west side of cemetery office</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 30, 2019
5. Beaufort National Cemetery Marker
(wide view • marker on west side of cemetery office)
Beaufort National Cemetery<br>(<i>view looking north from near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 30, 2019
6. Beaufort National Cemetery
(view looking north from near marker)
Beaufort National Cemetery Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 30, 2019
7. Beaufort National Cemetery Entrance
 

More. Search the internet for Beaufort National Cemetery.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 31, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 26, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 74 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on May 27, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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