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Staunton, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Staunton National Cemetery

 
 
Staunton National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2019
1. Staunton National Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  
National Cemetery
Staunton National Cemetery was established in 1867. The remains of 753 Union soldiers, of which 521 are unknown, lie here. The remains came from Staunton and Waynesboro city cemeteries, and the battlefields at Cross Keys, McDowell, Piedmont, Port Republic, and nearby locations. Sixty-seven Union prisoners who died in Confederate hospitals also lie here.

Gravel paths originally divided the 1.15-acre cemetery into four sections with a flagstaff mound at the center. In 1874, a stone Second Empire-style lodge and enclosure stone wall were completed.

After the Civil War, African Americans settled near the cemetery. The area became known as Uniontown Village. The neighborhood was home to the "Cemetery School." Throughout the nineteenth century, the community held annual Memorial Day services at Staunton National Cemetery.

Jackson's Valley Campaign (left panel)
Confederate Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson's thirty-four day campaign was a remarkable feat. His command marched 245 miles, fought four major battles, and swept the Union forces out of Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. General
Marker detail: Battle of Cross Keys image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Battle of Cross Keys
Battle of Cross Keys, one of four major battles fought during Jackson's Shenandoah Valley Campaign. Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, 1887.
Jackson's May 1862 victories at McDowell, Front Royal, and Winchester caused Union Gen. Nathaniel Banks to retreat across the Potomac River to Maryland.

The Union defeat forced Gen. John Frémont into action. He and Gen. Irvin McDowell were ordered to catch and crush Jackson. The Union's 40,000 men faced 18,000 led by Jackson. But the two Union armies were separated by Massanutten Mountain, which divides the valley. Jackson raced south and defeated Frémont at Cross Keys on June 8, then crossed the North River and defeated another Union column at Port Republic. These losses forced Union troops to retreat from the Shenandoah Valley.

Immigrant Veterans (right panel)
Nicolae (Nicholas) Dunca, a Romanian, arrived in New York four months before the Civil War began. He enlisted in the 12th New York Infantry. In March 1862, Gen. John C. Frémont appointed Captain Dunca to his staff. Dunca was killed on June 8, 1862, while delivering orders on the battlefield. He was reinterred here in Section B, Grave 292.

Maj. William O'Brien was the superintendent at Staunton National Cemetery when he died in February 1899. An immigrant from Ireland, he enlisted in the regular army and served on the western frontier before the Civil War. His regiment returned east for the duration of the war. Injured in battle at Frederick, Maryland, he recuperated in Alexandria,
Marker detail: Cemetery Plan, 1892 image. Click for full size.
National Archives and Records Administration
3. Marker detail: Cemetery Plan, 1892
Virginia. After the war he resumed his military duties. Prior to Staunton, he was in charge of Loudon Park, Fayetteville, and New Bern national cemeteries. He was buried in Section C, Grave 762.
 
Erected by U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Cemetery Administration.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Cemeteries marker series.
 
Location. 38° 8.415′ N, 79° 2.993′ W. Marker is in Staunton, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Richmond Avenue (U.S. 250) east of National Avenue, on the right when traveling west. Marker is located just inside the main gate, at the northwest corner of the cemetery office building. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 901 Richmond Avenue, Staunton VA 24401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Address by President Lincoln (here, next to this marker); United States National Military Cemetery - Staunton (a few steps from this marker); Great Indian Warrior Trading Path (approx. 0.6 miles away); First Settler's Grave (approx. 0.6 miles away); Avenue of Trees (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Barger House
Marker detail: Lodge with unknown grave markers at Staunton National Cemetery, 1908 image. Click for full size.
National Archives and Records Administration
4. Marker detail: Lodge with unknown grave markers at Staunton National Cemetery, 1908
(approx. 0.9 miles away); Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Staunton.
 
Regarding Staunton National Cemetery. National Register of Historic Places #96000034 (1996)
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Staunton National Cemetery
 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil
 
Staunton National Cemetery Marker<br>(<i>wide view • marker visible right/west side of lodge</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2019
5. Staunton National Cemetery Marker
(wide view • marker visible right/west side of lodge)
Staunton National Cemetery Flagstaff Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2019
6. Staunton National Cemetery Flagstaff Plaque
United States
National Military Cemetery
Staunton.
Established 1867.
Interments 753.
Known 232.
Unknown 521.
Staunton National Cemetery Flagstaff (<i>at center of cemetery • view from near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2019
7. Staunton National Cemetery Flagstaff (at center of cemetery • view from near marker)
 

More. Search the internet for Staunton National Cemetery.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 27, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 26, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 89 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on May 27, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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