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Cherokee in Swain County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Museum of the Cherokee Indian

 
 
Museum of the Cherokee Indian Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 7, 2019
1. Museum of the Cherokee Indian Marker
Inscription.  
"To preserve and perpetuate the history, culture, and stories of the Cherokee people."

To accomplish this mission, the museum maintains a permanent exhibit, extensive artifact collection, archives, education programs, artist series, and a museum store. The museum also publishes the Journal of Cherokee Studies.

The Museum of the Cherokee Indian opened in 1948 and moved to its present facility in 1976. Its exhibit was totally renovated in 1998, when a new 12,000-square-foot exhibit was installed. The museum is a non-profit organization with 501(c)3 status.

The museum has helped to revitalize the stamped pottery tradition by creating and working with the Cherokee Potters Guild; traditional dance by sponsoring the Warriors of AniKituhwa; traditional 18th century Cherokee dress; feather capes; and language. Because of this work, the museum received the Community Traditions Award from the North Carolina Arts Council.

The Museum of the Cherokee Indian is open daily except for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day.

The North Carolina mountains and foothills were designated the Blue
Marker detail: The Cherokee Museum<br>(<i>previsouly in downtown Cherokee, circa 1950</i>) image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: The Cherokee Museum
(previsouly in downtown Cherokee, circa 1950)
Ridge National Heritage Area in recognition of their natural beauty and living traditions of music, craft, agriculture, and Cherokee culture. This location is part of a regional trail of distinctive heritage sites. Ask for information at area visitor centers.

More information online at: www.blueridgeheritage.com

 
Erected by Blue Ridge Heritage Trail.
 
Location. 35° 29.083′ N, 83° 18.952′ W. Marker is in Cherokee, North Carolina, in Swain County. Marker is at the intersection of Drama Road (County Highway 1361) and Tsali Boulevard (U.S. 441), on the right when traveling east on Drama Road. Marker is located on the north side of the subject museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 589 Tsali Boulevard, Cherokee NC 28719, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sequoyah (a few steps from this marker); Trail of Tears (a few steps from this marker); Deer Clan (within shouting distance of this marker); Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, Inc. (within shouting distance of this marker); Wolf Clan (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Wild Potato Clan (about 500 feet away); Blue Clan (about 600 feet away); Long Hair Clan (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cherokee.
 
Also see . . .
1. Emissaries of Peace: The 1762 Cherokee & British Delegations
Marker detail: Depiction of 1762 Cherokee Delegation who traveled to London to meet King George III image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Depiction of 1762 Cherokee Delegation who traveled to London to meet King George III
. This exhibit tells the story of Henry Timberlake’s visit to the Cherokees in 1762, and how he took Cherokee leaders to London to meet with King George III. (Submitted on June 2, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Cherokee Chieftains at the British Court. In 1762, Ostenaco and two other Cherokee leaders, Cunneshote and Woyi, asked Henry Timberlake to take them to London in order to meet with King George III. “The bloody tommahawke, so long lifted against our brethren the English, must now be buried deep, deep in the ground, never to be raised again,” said Ostenaco. The group set sail for England in May 1762. The Cherokee delegation’s visit to London helped to secure the Proclamation Line of 1763, which forbade white settlers from claiming land west of the Appalachian Mountains. (Submitted on June 2, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicEducationNative Americans
 
Marker detail: Depiction of a Cherokee Medicine Man of the Mississippian Period image. Click for full size.
4. Marker detail: Depiction of a Cherokee Medicine Man of the Mississippian Period
Museum Cherokee Indian Marker<br>(<i>wide view • Sequoyah sculpture & museum entrance behind</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 7, 2019
5. Museum Cherokee Indian Marker
(wide view • Sequoyah sculpture & museum entrance behind)
 

More. Search the internet for Museum of the Cherokee Indian.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 3, 2019. This page originally submitted on June 2, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 75 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 2, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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