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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Unionville in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Suburban Park 1895-1905

 
 
Suburban Park 1895-1905 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, May 20, 2019
1. Suburban Park 1895-1905 Marker
Inscription.  
Also known as Rainbow Park, Suburban Park was owned and operated by the Farmington Street Railway Company, which charged fifteen cents for the one hour and fifteen-minute ride from Hartford. At thirty-five acres, the park extended well into today’s Farmington Woods. Although primarily an amusement park, it was also used for festivals, lectures, dances, and other special events. Wooden stairs at this entrance led uphill to the dance pavilion. Other park buildings include a pagoda, photography gallery, ice cream parlor, and trolley offices. There were acres of manicured lawns and water features, including canals and a dam. Miles of shaded paths snaked through the woods, well-lit by Japanese lanterns hung in the trees. Park goers played ball games and studied trees and birds. They played tennis and enjoyed swings and hammocks. The park was used by many organizations, such as the Courant’s Fresh Air Fund, Good Will Boys, Open Hearts Shelter, Sunday school picnics, Sisters of Mercy, and Friday Eve Club. Local factories held their company outings here. The park closed in 1905, after the trolley company reduced the schedule
Entrance to Suburban Park from Farmington Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, May 20, 2019
2. Entrance to Suburban Park from Farmington Avenue
and increased the fare.

After closing, the park’s land and buildings changed hands many times. During WW II, it was home to one of the town’s two airplane observation posts. In 1999, a developer sold the land to the town after a grassroots campaign by residents prevented him from mining the property for sand and gravel, and building fifty houses. Now town-owned, the park is a natural untouched open space for passive recreation, where the public can enjoy history and natural beauty.

 
Erected 2019.
 
Location. 41° 45.444′ N, 72° 52.986′ W. Marker is in Unionville, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is on Farmington Avenue (Connecticut Route 4), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1810 Farmington Avenue, Unionville CT 06085, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Unionville (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Water Fountain (about 700 feet away); Unionville Veterans Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); Unionville Civil War Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away); Yodkins-Morin Memorial Park (approx. 0.3 miles away); Farmington (approx. one mile away); Farmington Veterans Memorial
Ice Cream Parlor image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, May 5, 2015
3. Ice Cream Parlor
Courtesy of Unionville Museum.
(approx. one mile away); An Industrial History of Unionville, 1780-1880 (approx. 1.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Unionville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Suburban Park. (Submitted on June 5, 2019, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. Suburban Park. (Submitted on June 5, 2019, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
3. Suburban Park. (Submitted on June 5, 2019, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
4. Suburban Park. (Submitted on June 5, 2019, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. EntertainmentParks & Recreational AreasRailroads & Streetcars
 

More. Search the internet for Suburban Park 1895-1905.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 5, 2019. This page originally submitted on June 5, 2019, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 63 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 5, 2019, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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