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New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Abingdon Square Doughboy

Abingdon Square Park

 
 
Abingdon Square Doughboy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 30, 2018
1. Abingdon Square Doughboy Marker
Inscription.  As its faded inscription reads, this sculpture was "erected by popular subscription in honor of the brave men who went forth from this neighborhood to join the Armed Forces of the United States during the World War.” The dramatic bronze statue on a granite pedestal, dedicated in 1921, is by Philip Martiny (1858-1927), and depicts a foot soldier in battle (known commonly in World War I as a "doughboy"), pistol in one hand, the other holding a swirling American flag.

The derivation of the term doughboy remains in question. It was first used by the British in the late 18th and early 19th centuries to describe soldiers and sailors. In the United States the nickname was coined during the Mexican-American War (1846-1848), and was widely popularized during World War I (1914-1918) to refer to infantrymen. After the war, in which Americans saw combat in 1917-18, numerous communities commissioned doughboy statues to honor the local war heroes. The Abingdon Square Doughboy is one of eight such statues erected in New York City's parks.

The monument was a gift of the Jefferson Democratic Club, whose headquarters

Abingdon Square Doughboy Marker - wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 30, 2018
2. Abingdon Square Doughboy Marker - wide view
once stood opposite this statue north of the park on the site now occupied by the residential high rise at 299 West 12th Street. Philip Martiny was a well-known sculptor of his day who received numerous public commissions, among them the statues on the Surrogate Courthouse in Lower Manhattan, and the Chelsea Doughboy at 28th Street and 9th Avenue (for which the same model posed). The unveiling of the statue is reported to have been attended by 10,000 spectators, including 200 Gold Star Mothers (those who lost their sons in battle), and New York Governor Alfred E. Smith. In 1993, the statue was cleaned of soiling and surface corrosion, repatined, and waxed by the NYC Parks monuments unit, and since 1996 has been cared for by NYC Parks' Citywide Monuments Conservation Program, supported in part by the Abingdon Square Conservancy and contributions from individual donors.

In 2004, during the redesign and renovation of the park, the monument was relocated to face the southern entryway, improving its visibility and illumination. It remains a focal point of Abingdon Square and a symbol of sacrifice and community pride.
 
Erected by NYC Parks.
 
Location. 40° 44.241′ N, 74° 0.331′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York

Abingdon Square Doughboy image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 30, 2018
3. Abingdon Square Doughboy
County. Memorial can be reached from the intersection of Hudson Street and 8th Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10014, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Beatrice Inn (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 82 Jane Street (about 600 feet away); James Baldwin (about 800 feet away); The Davisson-Germer Experiment (approx. 0.2 miles away); Westbeth Artists’ Housing (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mercier (Merce) Philip Cunningham (approx. 0.2 miles away); Greenwich Village Historic District (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hart Crane (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located within the park, amongst some of the benches on the Hudson Street side of the park.
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicParks & Recreational AreasWar, World I
 
The Abingdon Square Doughboy image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, July 4, 2009
4. The Abingdon Square Doughboy
Abingdon Square Doughboy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 10, 2019
5. Abingdon Square Doughboy Marker
The lettering was faded even in 2009.
 

More. Search the internet for Abingdon Square Doughboy.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 14, 2019. This page originally submitted on June 7, 2019, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 59 times since then. Last updated on June 10, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 7, 2019, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   4. submitted on June 11, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   5. submitted on June 10, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.
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