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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lexington in Fayette County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Black Lexingtonians Believed Strongly in Education 1865

Empowerment through Learning

 

Downtown African-American Heritage Trail

 
Black Lexingtonians Believed Strongly in Education 1865 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 14, 2019
1. Black Lexingtonians Believed Strongly in Education 1865 Marker
Inscription.  Before the Civil War, black Lexingtonians established private schools in churches and educated missionaries who were sent around the world. After 1865, with the support of the Freedmen's Bureau, four free schools for black students were established.

One of those, Howard School, was located here on Church Street. The building was known as the "Ladies Hall" because of women's fundraising efforts for the school. Howard School grew into the region's largest school for African American students. By 1872, taxes supported public schools for African Americans on Fourth, Constitution, and Patterson Streets.

Student segregation continued
Public schools were segregated by race until the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision. Both Lexington and Fayette County high schools soon integrated.

Lexington's lower schools, however, remained segregated until black parents successfully challenged the school system in Robert Jefferson et al. v. Fayette County Board of Education (1971-72). The judge ordered development of a plan to fully integrate Lexington's schools.
 
Erected
View of marker looking west towards North Upper Street. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 14, 2019
2. View of marker looking west towards North Upper Street.
2018 by Together Lexington. (Marker Number 8.)
 
Location. 38° 2.885′ N, 84° 29.773′ W. Marker is in Lexington, Kentucky, in Fayette County. Marker is on Church Street west of North Limestone Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 168 North Upper Street, Lexington KY 40507, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Christ Church Cathedral (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Slavery in Fayette Co. / Cheapside Slave Auction Block (about 400 feet away); From Enslaved to Community Activist / The Original Power Couple (about 400 feet away); Lexington's Long History with Slavery / Driven by Money (about 400 feet away); John Hunt Morgan (1825-1864) (about 500 feet away); Samuel Brown, M.D. (1769 - 1830) (about 500 feet away); U.S. Vice President (about 500 feet away); First Presbyterian Church (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lexington.
 
Regarding Black Lexingtonians Believed Strongly in Education 1865.
Jim Crow (1865-1950s)
Legal and financial networks during this time refused to serve or protect African-Americans. They were spatially segregated in housing options, transportation systems, and public spaces, and deprived of quality education, healthcare, and employment.

Those
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who challenged these systems were met with violence, but threats did not prevent resistance. Many did not accept these practices and used activities in their daily lives to shape their own identities. Lexington was home to a range of vocal activists, philanthropists, and successful entrepreneurs that did not let oppression define them.
 
Also see . . .  Program website about the marker. (Submitted on July 22, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. African AmericansEducation
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on July 29, 2019. This page originally submitted on July 22, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 47 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 22, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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