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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Nancy in Pulaski County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Last Stand

Mill Springs Battlefield

 

National Historic Landmark

 
The Last Stand Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 12, 2019
1. The Last Stand Marker
Inscription.  The Confederates west of the road fled in disarray after the 9th Ohio Infantry executed a successful bayonet charge. The pursuing Federals turned the tide on the east side of the road and the entire Confederate line broke. The 16th Alabama Infantry stood firm against the surging Federals here, on "Last Stand Hill." Their determined resistance allowed the beaten Confederate army to escape.

Held in Reserve
The 16th Alabama commanded by Colonel William B. Wood, a Methodist minister, had held their ground south of the battle all morning. Wood watched the action unfold while his regiment, one of only two armed with modern weapons, stood in reserve. Bullets whizzed around the men numbed by the cold, wet weather. The constant smoke and noise of battle kept them on edge, as they waited for two hours for orders.

Colonel Wood Makes a Stand
As the Confederate line fell apart, General William Carroll ordered the 16th Alabama to move forward. Wood moved the regiment to the crest of the hill and saw the Union line marching toward him. Confederate soldiers rushed to the rear knowing that all that stood between them and

The Last Stand Marker at area of battle. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 12, 2019
2. The Last Stand Marker at area of battle.
disaster was Col. Wood's 330 men.

Wood ordered the men "to stand their position and meet the enemy, drive him back or die in their tracks. "Rallying several companies of the 29th Tennessee, Wood made a stand. The regiment fired a volley, retreated a short distance behind a rail fence, and fired again. How long they held is unclear, but this small detachment stalled the Union pursuit. They created a gap that allowed the bulk of the Confederate army to escape capture.

Inset portrait: The regiments ... continued to hold the enemy at bay, slowly retiring from the field now lost to us.
General William Carroll, C.S.
 
Erected 2014 by Mill Springs Battlefield Association.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 37° 3.167′ N, 84° 44.252′ W. Marker is near Nancy, Kentucky, in Pulaski County. Marker is on Kentucky Route 235 0.3 miles south of Kentucky Route 761, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Nancy KY 42544, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Rutledge's Battery (here, next to this marker); Turpin/Simpson Properties (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Confederate Retreat (about 600

Marker is at the Mill Springs Battlefield Tour Stop # 3. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 12, 2019
3. Marker is at the Mill Springs Battlefield Tour Stop # 3.
feet away); The Union Advance (approx. 0.2 miles away); Victory! (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Dead (approx. 0.2 miles away); Dawn of Battle (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Mass Grave Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Nancy.
 
Also see . . .  Mill Springs Battlefield Association. (Submitted on August 2, 2019.)
 
Categories. LandmarksWar, US Civil
 

More. Search the internet for The Last Stand.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 2, 2019. This page originally submitted on July 25, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 65 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 25, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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