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Fort Recovery in Mercer County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Burying the U.S. Army Dead

 
 
Burying the U.S. Army Dead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
1. Burying the U.S. Army Dead Marker
Inscription.  Pioneer Cemetery is the oldest cemetery in Mercer County, with burials from 1812 to 1873. Those buried here were some of the first Euro-Americans who settled the area. Many of these families helped lay out the town of Fort Recovery, established Recovery and Gibson townships, and started businesses prior to the village''s incorporation in 1858. Samuel McDowell, a survivor of both the Battle of the Wabash and the Battle of Fort Recovery, is buried here. McDowell returned to Fort Recovery in the 1830s as one of the earliest settlers. Descendants of McDowell and other of these early pioneers still live in the Fort Recovery area today.

This cemetery was also a temporary burial site of the remains of soldiers who died in the Battle of the Wabash (1791) and the Battle of Fort Recovery (1794). In 1851, bones were discovered by children playing on the banks of the Wabash River. The human remains were of soldiers killed in battle some 60 years earlier. The bones were kept safe for the summer while ceremony preparations were made. Over 5.0o0 people from Kentucky, Indiana, Virginia, Tennessee, and Ohio gathered on September 10, 1851 for the
Burying the U.S. Army Dead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
2. Burying the U.S. Army Dead Marker
Close-up view of the photograph that is displayed on this marker. The caption reads as follows: In 1886, the citizens of fort recovery petitioned Congress for a monument to be built to commemorate the veterans of the two battles. The request was not granted, so the village erected a temporary wood and sand coated monument at the intersection of Wayne and Butler streets. The inscription at the base read "Honor the Heroes of 1791." A natural gas pipe ran up to the top of the monument where it could be lit at night. After several years, it was deemed a safety hazard, moved to a park, and was blown down in a windstorm. It was replaced in 1913 by the current 101-foot-tall obelisk in Monument Park.
celebration known as "Bone Burying Day.” The remains were transported to Pioneer Cemetery in 13 walnut caskets. The soldiers remains were moved to the site of Monument Park in 1891 where they were buried and surrounded by a wood and iron enclosure for over 20 years. In 1913, the soldiers remains were reinterred in a crypt within the current obelisk at Monument Park.

"On the morning of the battle [I] and several others had just gone out to look after and guard their horses, when suddenly [we] heard the most hideous yells from the opposite side of the river, with discharges of musketry..."
-Samuel McDowell, a Kentucky sharpshooter who survived the two battles. McDowell returned in the 1830s and was one of the early settlers of Fort Recovery His remains lie here in Pioneer Cemetery.
 
Erected by National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program and the State of Ohio. (Marker Number 14.)
 
Location. 40° 24.648′ N, 84° 46.888′ W. Marker is in Fort Recovery, Ohio, in Mercer County. Marker is on Gwendolyn Street south of Washington Street, on the right when traveling south. This marker is located on the eastern edge of the grounds of the Pioneer Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 204 Gwendolyn Street, Fort Recovery OH 45846, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least
Burying the U.S. Army Dead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
3. Burying the U.S. Army Dead Marker
View, looking northwest, of the marker in the foreground, and the nearby grave of Samuel McDowell, survivor of the two battles, in the background.
8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Samuel McDowell (a few steps from this marker); Pioneer Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); VanTrees Donation (approx. 0.2 miles away); Gen. Richard Butler (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Greeneville Treaty Boundary Line (approx. 0.2 miles away); Sha'anoe Warrior Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Battle of Fallen Timbers and the Treaty of Greeneville (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Franke Historical Walkway (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Recovery.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWars, US Indian
 
Burying the U.S. Army Dead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
4. Burying the U.S. Army Dead Marker
View of the marker looking north along Gwendolyn Street.
Burying the U.S. Army Dead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
5. Burying the U.S. Army Dead Marker
View of the marker looking south along Gwendolyn Street.
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on August 5, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 5, 2019, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 51 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 5, 2019, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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