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Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Powel House

1765

 
 
Powel House Marker image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, January 6, 2019
1. Powel House Marker
Inscription.  He was the enemy of all exorbitants Powers and a sincere Friend to the Liberties of his Country. To all this was added a Taste for Science, for the Fine Arts and for all the Improvements of Civil Life.
Epitaph of Samuel Powel, Christ Church Burial Ground

Samuel Powel (1738-1793) and his wife Elizabeth Willing Powel (1742-1830) were among the leaders of late 18th century Philadelphia. Powel owned real estate in and around Philadelphia, including large sections of Society Hill.

After graduating from The Academy of Philadelphia, now the University of Pennsylvania, Powel finished his education with a grand tour of Europe. He returned to devote himself to public service and to Philadelphia's learned institutions. Powel, known as the "Patriot Mayor" served as the last colonial mayor of Philadelphia and was the first mayor of the city after the creation of the United States. He served as an influential trustee for many of the city's leading civic and learned institutions.

Elizabeth Willing Powel was born to a family prominent in business, finance and politics. Like other women of her day, Elizabeth made her mark
Powel House Marker image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, January 6, 2019
2. Powel House Marker
Viewing marker from north.
on political life through social ties to the men who governed. She was a noted hostess and a witty conversationalist. Elizabeth is credited with helping persuade Washington to serve a second term as president. The Powels entertained George Washington, John Adams, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, and the Marquis de Lafayette in this house.

Samuel Powel bought this house shortly before his marriage in 1765. Charles Stedman built the stately mid-Georgian townhouse in 1765. Noted American architect Robert Smith updated it for the Powels using Philadelphia's finest artisans. They furnished it with equal care. Elizabeth live here five years after Samuel died in the Yellow Fever epidemic of 1793. Today the house is a public museum interpreting its years as the Powels' residence.

(Color image of man.)
Samuel Powel, c. 1760 by Angelica Kaufman Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Landmarks

(Color image of woman.)
Elizabeth Powel, c. 1798 by Matthew Pratt Philadelphia Museum of Art

(Color images of two rooms.)
Above: Entry Hall showing archway, mahogany staircase, (unreadable) and door. Above right: Second floor parlor or ballroom, site of musical gatherings of early American leaders.

(Color image of garden.)
(Unreadable) of the Powel (Unreadable) and garden.

(Color image of Philadelphia.)
View
Powel House exterior. image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, January 6, 2019
3. Powel House exterior.
Viewing house from east.
from 3rd and Spruce Streets looking north. The Powel House is just beyond the trees. (Source of image is unreadable.)
 
Erected by Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Landmarks.
 
Location. 39° 56.746′ N, 75° 8.807′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is on South 3rd Street 0.1 miles from Spruce Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 242, Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Landmarks (here, next to this marker); The House of Samuel Powel (here, next to this marker); The Home of Juan de Miralles (here, next to this marker); The Home of John Penn (here, next to this marker); Interred in this church yard are the mortal remains of General Thomas Proctor (within shouting distance of this marker); “Common Sense” (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Caspar Wistar (about 400 feet away); Old St. Mary's (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
Also see . . .  Powel House, Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Landmarks. (Submitted on August 12, 2019.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
Samuel Powel, Mayor of Philadelphia image. Click for full size.
New York Public Library Digital Collection
4. Samuel Powel, Mayor of Philadelphia
List of Visible Markers image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, January 6, 2019
5. List of Visible Markers
Viewing markers from east.
 

More. Search the internet for Powel House.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 15, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 12, 2019. This page has been viewed 72 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 12, 2019. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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