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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near London in Laurel County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Millstones Through The Ages

 
 
Millstones Through The Ages Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 13, 2019
1. Millstones Through The Ages Marker
Inscription.  The story of millstones is the story of man's struggle against hunger.
Using millstones was the best way to grind grain for over 2000 years. An alternative method was not popularized until around 1870, when roller mills were developed that cut the grain between corrugated steel rollers.
Across the bridge you will see one of the largest displays of grain milling stones in existence.

The concept of grinding grain between a rotating upper stone and stationary lower stone was developed over 2000 years ago. first mill of this type was turned by hand and was known as a quern. This was the direct ancestor of the larger millstones found in water-powered mills.

Drawing captions
Left bottom: Uncommon cone shaped under runner stones. In this type, it is the bottom stone that turns.
Middle: In a pair of traditional millstones often called buhrs only the upper runner stone revolves. The lower bedstone is stationary.
Right top: Prehistoric man discovered that pounding grain with a rock made it easier to eat.
Right middle: Some Indians and early pioneer
Marker can be seen on right of sidewalk in distance. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 13, 2019
2. Marker can be seen on right of sidewalk in distance.
families used a mortar and pestle to pound corn into cornmeal.
Right bottom: Rubbing grain with a small stone pushed back and forth formed a saddle-shaped concavity. This became known as a saddlestone.
 
Location. 37° 5.059′ N, 84° 3.317′ W. Marker is near London, Kentucky, in Laurel County. Marker can be reached from Levi Jackson Road (Kentucky Route 1006) west of Mountain Life Museum Road, on the left when traveling west. Located at Levi Jackson Park Mill. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Levi Jackson Road, London KY 40744, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. "The people went and gathered it and ground it in mills." (here, next to this marker); Dressing a Millstone (within shouting distance of this marker); Where did Millstones Come From? (within shouting distance of this marker); Daniel Boone's Trail (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Laurel County (approx. mile away); CSA Returns to Tenn. (approx. one mile away); Wilderness Road Inn (approx. 1.2 miles away); Modrel's Station (approx. 2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in London.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceParks & Recreational Areas
 
The largest collection of old millstones in the U.S. at this park. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 13, 2019
3. The largest collection of old millstones in the U.S. at this park.
McHargue's Mill at the park. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 13, 2019
4. McHargue's Mill at the park.
McHargue's Mill was built in 1939 by the Civilian Conservation Corps. It stands on the banks of the Little Laurel River where it intersects with Boone's Trace, a historic pioneer road built by Daniel Boone.
A collection of the millstones. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 13, 2019
5. A collection of the millstones.
A few of these millstones are of European origin, having been brought to America by early immigrants. The stones in the mill itself date back to 1805, and were carried by wagon or ox cart over the original Wilderness Road.
 

More. Search the internet for Millstones Through The Ages.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 18, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 18, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 46 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 18, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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