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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near London in Laurel County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Where did Millstones Come From?

 
 
Where did Millstones Come From? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 13, 2019
1. Where did Millstones Come From? Marker
Inscription.  One of the greatest problems faced by the early millers was where and how to obtain suitable millstones. Rocks of exceptional hardness were required. Since suitable rock was not locally available, a long journey in the back of an ox-driven wagon would be a likely part of the history of many of the stones around you.

Millstone quarries were located at sources of rock with the special qualities needed for grinding. A tremendous amount of work went into shaping millstones from the raw rock. If a flaw appeared as a stone was being shaped, it was usually discarded.

The earliest American grain mills were equipped with millstones imported from Europe. Across the path to your right you may have noticed two large millstones that have been pieced together from smaller rock segments. These are French buhrs, composed of rock from famous, centuries-old millstone quarries near Paris, France.

Some of the millstones you see here were made from hard sandstone rock. A great many were made from conglomerate, a term for rock containing lots of small pebbles. These were sometimes called hailgrit or pebble grit millstones. Although
Marker in far background, on right of two. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 13, 2019
2. Marker in far background, on right of two.
not as good as some of the imported stones for producing high quality wheat flour, these native rocks were well suited for grinding animal feed and meal from corn- a staple pioneer food.
 
Location. 37° 5.049′ N, 84° 3.303′ W. Marker is near London, Kentucky, in Laurel County. Marker can be reached from Levi Jackson Road (Kentucky Route 1006) west of Mountain Life Museum Road, on the right when traveling west. Located at Levi Jackson Park Mill. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Levi Jackson Road, London KY 40744, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Dressing a Millstone (here, next to this marker); Millstones Through The Ages (within shouting distance of this marker); "The people went and gathered it and ground it in mills." (within shouting distance of this marker); Daniel Boone's Trail (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Laurel County (approx. mile away); CSA Returns to Tenn. (approx. 0.9 miles away); Wilderness Road Inn (approx. 1.2 miles away); Modrel's Station (approx. 2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in London.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNotable PlacesParks & Recreational Areas
 
Millstones and the marker (farthest of two). image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 13, 2019
3. Millstones and the marker (farthest of two).
A few of these millstones are of European origin, having been brought to America by early immigrants. The stones in the mill itself date back to 1805, and were carried by wagon or ox cart over the original Wilderness Road.
The largest collection of old millstones in the U.S. at this park. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 13, 2019
4. The largest collection of old millstones in the U.S. at this park.
McHargue's Mill at the park. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 13, 2019
5. McHargue's Mill at the park.
McHargue's Mill was built in 1939 by the Civilian Conservation Corps. It stands on the banks of the Little Laurel River where it intersects with Boone's Trace, a historic pioneer road built by Daniel Boone.
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on August 18, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 18, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 18, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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