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Franklin in Venango County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Venango County Civil War Monument

 
 
Venango County Civil War Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 11, 2019
1. Venango County Civil War Monument Marker
Inscription.  

This Civil War Monument commemorates 400 Venango County soldiers who died during the war. These soldiers fought in many battles including Lookout Mountain, Bull Run, Yorktown, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and Antietam. Some were killed in action or died from their wounds. Other died as prisoners of war at Libby, Belle Isle, and Andersonville Prisons.

Two famous generals are among those whose names are on the Monument. Prior to the Civil War Major General Jesse L. Reno had earned a reputation as a "soldier's soldier," often fighting beside his troops without a sword or any sign of his rank. During the Battle of South Mountain as Reno reconnoitered the Confederate position at Fox's Gap, he was shot in the chest by a Confederate sharpshooter and died soon after.

A brave and heroic leader, Brigadier General Alexander Hays fought at the Battles of Yorktown, Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Savage's Station, and Malvern Hill. His leadership enabled his division to break the final charge of Pickett's men at Gettysburg. He was killed in action at the Battle of the Wilderness.

Let us never forget all

Venango County Civil War Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 11, 2019
2. Venango County Civil War Monument Marker
the soldiers and sailors who made the ultimate sacrifice to abolish slavery and to preserve the Union.
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In June 1864, the U.S. Sanitary Commission held a Soldiers and Sailors Sanitary Fair in Pittsburgh to collect money and supplies for Union Soldiers. Prizes were offered, including a monument worth more than $2,000 to be given to the County of Western Pennsylvania, Ohio or West Virginia that raised the greatest amount of contributions. The citizens of Venango County raised the most and won the marble shaft.

On September 10, 1866, thousands of people converged on Franklin to be part of the ceremonies for the dedication of the new Monument.

At 2 p.m., the distant sound of martial music proclaimed that the soldiers were coming.

The infantry led the parade, followed by the artillery and then the cavalry. The infantry wore a blue sash, the artillery a red sash, and the cavalry a yellow sash. The Franklin Band, the "new cornet band," marched in the parade and played during the ceremony.

At the close of the dedication these words were spoken:
"And while these laurel-decked hills that environ our county seat shall stand, let that monument that tells of the county's contribution to the death roll of patriotism be cherished and decked

Venango County Civil War Monument Panel image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 11, 2019
3. Venango County Civil War Monument Panel
with flowers on each returning May. And let all our soldiers, dead or living, be honored in the hearts of their fellow citizens for their work on our behalf."
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[Written on the monument]

Erected July 4, 1866
by the Citizens of Venango Co.
in memory of the brave heroes of this county
who died in defense of the Union in the
War of the Great Rebellion

[Roll of Honored Dead]

[Metal] Civil War Plaques dedicated July 4, 1990


 
Erected 1866 by the U.S. Sanitary Commission through public support by the Citizens of Venango County.
 
Location. 41° 23.826′ N, 79° 49.614′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Pennsylvania, in Venango County. Memorial is on Liberty Street (U.S. 62) east of 12th Street, on the left when traveling east. Monument is the centerpiece of Bandstand Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Franklin PA 16323, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. George Bissell (within shouting distance of this marker); Venango County Vietnam Veterans Honor Roll (within shouting distance of this marker); World War I Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Venango County Courthouse
Venango County Civil War Monument Panel image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 11, 2019
4. Venango County Civil War Monument Panel
(within shouting distance of this marker); Venango County (within shouting distance of this marker); World War I Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Galena-Signal Oil Company (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Brigadier General Alfred B. McCalmont (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkMan-Made FeaturesPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil
 
Venango County Civil War Monument Panel image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 11, 2019
5. Venango County Civil War Monument Panel
Venango County Civil War Monument Panel image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 11, 2019
6. Venango County Civil War Monument Panel
Venango County Civil War Monument, Panels, and Markers image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 11, 2019
7. Venango County Civil War Monument, Panels, and Markers
Venango County Civil War Monument Honored Dead image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 11, 2019
8. Venango County Civil War Monument Honored Dead
Venango County Civil War Monument Honored Dead image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 11, 2019
9. Venango County Civil War Monument Honored Dead
 

More. Search the internet for Venango County Civil War Monument.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 21, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 21, 2019, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 34 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on August 21, 2019, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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