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Granbury in Hood County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

City named for Texas Confederate General H.B. Granbury

1831 - 1864

 
 
City named for Texas Confederate General H.B. Granbury Marker Front image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, August 10, 2019
1. City named for Texas Confederate General H.B. Granbury Marker Front
Inscription.  
(Front)
A Mississippian. Came to Texas early 1850s. Lawyer in Waco. Recruited Waco Guards, Confederate Army, 1861. Elected Major 7th Texas Infantry. Beat back Federals some miles, Fort Donelson, Tenn., Feb. 1862. Captured there, exchanged Aug. Colonel in Vicksburg campaign to prevent split of Confederacy along Mississippi River. Took 306 men into battle, lost 158. Chickamauga, Sept. 1863 severely wounded. Had brigade command Missionary Ridge. Promoted Brigadier General 1864. Led Granbury's Texas Brigade into Tennessee with Hood. Was one of 6 Confederate Generals killed at Franklin, Tenn. Buried in Granbury Cemetery.

(Rear)
Granbury's Texas Brigade

Formed in Autumn 1863 from remnant of Deshler's Brigade. Texas units included 6th, 7th, 10th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 24th, 25th Infantry, with 3rd, 5th Confederate Regiments of Memphis. Nov. 1863 battles of Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Granbury's men repulsed Sherman's attacks repeatedly. C.S.A. Congress thanked unit for valor at Ringgold Gap. At Kennesaw Mountain, this and fellow Brigade counted 700 enemy casualties at
City named for Texas Confederate General H.B. Granbury Marker Rear image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, August 10, 2019
2. City named for Texas Confederate General H.B. Granbury Marker Rear
their front after one charge. In bayonet combat, yells in the dark from Granbury's men were sufficient to rout Federals. Before troops of equal number in open field the unit was unconquerable. Fought intrenched army, Franklin, Tenn. Battle flags flying, drums rolling, but with no cover Granbury's men ran forth on the double. Courage inspired by the leader named it forever: Granbury's Brigade.
 
Erected 1964 by the State of Texas. (Marker Number 6251.)
 
Location. 32° 26.551′ N, 97° 47.222′ W. Marker is in Granbury, Texas, in Hood County. Marker is on East Pearl Street (Business U.S. 377), on the right when traveling west. Marker is located on the south end of the courthouse grounds. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 West Pearl Street, Granbury TX 76048, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Nellie Gray Robertson (here, next to this marker); County Named for Famous Confederate General John Bell Hood (here, next to this marker); Hood County Courthouse (here, next to this marker); Harris Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Granbury Opera House (within shouting distance of this marker); Haynes-Burns-Ewell Building (within shouting distance
City named for Texas Confederate General H.B. Granbury Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, August 10, 2019
3. City named for Texas Confederate General H.B. Granbury Marker
Marker is the rightmost of the two granite markers visible in the photo.
of this marker); The Granbury House (within shouting distance of this marker); Baker-Rylee Building and Town Square Service Station (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Granbury.
 
Also see . . .
1. Granbury, Hiram Bronson - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on September 6, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 

2. Granbury's Texas Brigade - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on September 6, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 

More. Search the internet for City named for Texas Confederate General H.B. Granbury.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 6, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 6, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 36 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 6, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.
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